What Significant Challenges are missing from our list?

Instructions: Please use the prompt below to help you consider what might need to be added to the current list of Horizon Challenges. Add your thoughts below, using a new entry for each new significant challenge.

*Please add your comments to your peers' new entries if you agree or disagree or wish to add a different perspective/elaborate.* If you have general comments to make on another Panel member's entry, please add them to the end in Section (6).

What would you list among the significant challenges that are impeding educational technology adoption at some or many educational institutions today that arguably ALL institutions should be working to solve?

Each new challenge entry must include a title, a description similar to the ones that are written now, and, if needed, a rationale as to why it is different from any of the existing challenges. Additionally, there are a few prompts designed to gather other pertinent information about the topic, such as its implications for policy, leadership, and practice; and any projects (even in the initial or research stages) that you know of that involve the challenge added.

Please "sign" your contributions by marking them with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples -- like this: - Sam Sam Feb 11, 2014

If you have entered in a brand new topic, please make your signature next to the title of the topic.


VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - brumbaugh brumbaugh Mar 3, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014 - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014- ole ole Mar 4, 2014 - Sam Sam Mar 4, 2014- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014 - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014

1. Accommodating Alternative Credentialing - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
This is related to the existing challenge Competition from New Models of Education. As new models emerge, the question of how best to accept and/or provide academic credit for those who participate in the new models arises. Example: I take a MOOC from a reputable institution and wish for another institution to accept that in lieu of a required course.


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Financially, institutions need to develop new revenue models. If an institution accepts a student's prior work from another institution as evidence of knowledge acquisition and waives his/her need to take a course or courses, revenue is potentially lost.
From a curricula standpoint, institutions need to develop ways to ensure that a student's prior work from another institution does indeed meet or exceed an acceptable level of quality.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Leadership will have to develop new models. Leadership will have to form new partnerships with other institutions, perhaps forming new governance models that transcend any single institution. Defining a common language that transcends a specific delivery mechanism (such as MOOCs) to discuss academic credit and proof of an individual's knowledge in a given area must be created.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Even if "outside" credentials are accepted in an institution, prerequisite skills analysis for degree programs and courses within those programs will have to be beefed up quite a bit. If gaps are identified in a student's knowledge base, some form of remediation could be offered.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?

  • Western Governor's University - http://www.wgu.edu
  • Credit transfer protocols currently used in universities. Also Matriculation processes.
  • Digital Badges.
  • Digital Promise is working on a micro credentialing program for teachers - brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014
  • Leading Edge Certification is another credentialing program for teachers to demonstrate skills in the use of educational technology - brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014
  • a number of ePortfolio projects or focusing on the area of how to adequately document student learning or alternative assessment

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- jnxyz jnxyz Feb 20, 2014 I'd very much agree with this being a challenge - educators can innovate all we like, but if the set-in-stone assessments can't accommodate badges or more digital means of assessing and credential-ing, then it can all grind to a halt... - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 20, 2014 Absolutely! This is related to another trend, the EdTech Backlash, which I'll add below. It's educators who are digging in their proverbial heels re:, e.g., acknowledging online learning credentials. "It's not how I got my degree, so it can't possibly be any good." - ole ole Feb 21, 2014 In this world of increasing internationalization this problem / challenge must be addressed. It's not only what goes on within the borders of the individual countries but to a large degree also what happens across borders. But like David I hear the uproar from many universities that don't think of the future but first and foremost on the good old days. Of course, however, there is a quality assurance problem, but it should be covered in contacts like the ones we use today in connection with student exchange.
- ole ole Feb 24, 2014 Forgot one thing: plagiarism / having other people make one's assessments - items that opponents will cling to, but this problem exists also in connection with homework assignments.
http://epirate.shu.edu/?p=1344
- sbedard sbedard Feb 22, 2014 Seton Hall - DIgital Badges Engage Incoming Freshman http://epirate.shu.edu/?p=1344
Agree with inclusion of this challenge! - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014
Agree with inclusion of this challenge - here is a news article of relevance:
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/10/29/coursera-strikes-mooc-licensing-deal-antioch-university
- vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014
I'm certainly in agreement that we have only just seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of the ways in which 'badging' can provide a response to employers desire to ensure a more 'work-ready' graduate- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014
Although I agree this is something that is coming, it makes curriculum planning exceedingly difficulty. When a program is written, it is planned as a whole, not course by course. We have to break things up into courses to meet other practices, policies etc. If we really look at how learning is happens, it is through a series of interrelated experiences that build on one another. When we begin piecing together bits and pieces of different programs, can we assure students achieve the outcomes intended? If so, are we minimizing the learning experience to observable and measurable skills/outcomes. I also wonder how this differs for different learners. For example, a 'career changer' returning to school after having been part of the workforce will have more experiences to connect new learning to, but a young inexperienced college student may not. - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 23, 2014 This is very much a need in K-12. Not just for instructors but for director support staf in K-12. Sometimes vision outside the credentialed areas of expertise is just what the system needs. Educators often focus on why they can't do something instead of why they can do it. - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014
I agree that this is a significant challenge. There is more to this than just whether a student should receive the credit - how do we ensure that the student with the badge is the one who earned it. I suppose that is where PLARs and Portfolios can help - lkoster lkoster Feb 25, 2014

Just a plea to think about this in an international context, there's a huge opportunity for Transnational Eduction, need to make sure the terminology is transferable - nwitt nwitt Feb 24, 2014

It's not just credentialing for students, it's one we need for teachers, too. We need to reformat our PD programs. We're too locked into systems that have failed us in the past. We need a new Organizational Design (OD). - michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 25, 2014

Could this be a pathway into making higher ed more accessible to those who have been left out in the cold? A big subset of the world has limited access to academia, and providing new alternative methods could be an opportunity to reach out to those populations and convert them into learners and potential revenue streams. - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Feb 25, 2014
- ole ole Feb 26, 2014
This is an very important and in some countries and circles undercommunicated topic. It addresses both the interface between formal and informal education, it questions the role of the (national) curriculum as an expression of what students should learn as well as our notion of what knowledge and skills are needed in the workplace of tomorrow and beyond. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 26, 2014
- bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014 It seems to me that we've already developed validated assessments that would get at this question: AP exams. College credit has been awarded for good scores on them for a long time, and colleges have been able to work this into their business model in most cases. Would they be able to do so indefinitely, for a range of exams? Not sure about that.



VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014 - Sam Sam Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014 - Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

2. Revolution of Employment - jnxyz jnxyz Feb 20, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014

Rise of AI and Robots, and What it Means for Today's Students

(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
As happened in the Industrial Revolution where machines replaced humans in many occupations, the digital revolution is seeing many jobs being done by AI software (i.e. writing sports news reports). Other examples are the fact that British Telecom employees over 100,000 people and is worth 33 billion pounds, while WhatsApp with 55 employees is now valued at US$19 billion.
Also see this article on the impact of the digital on the traditional business of photography - i.e. Kodak once employed 140,000 people and served millions of customers where now Instagram serves 450 million or so with only perhaps a couple of hundred employees.
Jaron Lanier: The Internet destroyed the middle class

The challenge then is how to educate todays students for this world - can a focus on creating and making give them the skills they will need?

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?



(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Leadership in higher ed, must step past current employment needs and look at how we develop critical thinking, problem solving and creative thinking - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 23, 2014.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?
Teaching Students to Be Great Students - http://istudy.psu.edu


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
I believe that this is at the heart of the higher education dilemma, if not for other sectors too. For what future do we educate our students and how do we best equip them to respond to it and shape it? I feel this is where higher education truly can seek to provide a 'higher education' that formerly educates students to be capable of responding to and shaping this future in core and fundamental ways underpin by a strong set of ethical values- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014 This is an interesting one to me, I often hear conversations in the general media that promote higher education should be about job preparation. This gets defined by many through surveys of the needs of local employers. Higher Ed is then asked to design curriculum to meet current needs despite the fact that we know in 4-6 years those needs are going to be dramatically different. - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 23, 2014
For me, it's not so much about robots, it's about the unknown and preparing one's self to function and adapt to unknown circumstances. While teaching content is not totally dead (individuals will always need a base level of info. in any subject), we need to teach people how to acquire new info. in an effective and efficient manner. - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 24, 2014
This is important in K-12 as relates to career/college ready also. The jobs we do now should be very different 5-7 years from now, although I am not going to hold my breath. It seems the pace of rcognition and change needs to pick up pace in education.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014
The jobs of tomorrow either aren't' here yet, or our schools are not up to date with what's happening now. In our school, we have to plan changes 1.5year out. Ie. I am making changes now to curriculum that won't take effect until Fall 2015. It's great to do an environmental scan but what happens when the "enviornment" change by the time the new program is rolled out? Difficult to keep up with long timelines that the we are tied to. - lkoster lkoster Feb 25, 2014
A great read on this topic that has really informed my decision making recently is Erik Brynoflsson and Andrew McAffee's Race Against the Machine (
http://www.amazon.com/Race-Against-Machine-Accelerating-Productivity/dp/0984725113/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1393366785&sr=8-1&keywords=race+against+the+machine). It's only about 75 pages long and has some nice suggestions for education. It's nice and short so I love sharing it with colleagues (they might actually read it.) - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 25, 2014
- bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014 I agree with brett that students need to learn how to learn. This, along with teaching creativity, seems to be the best hope of overcoming this challege. - lbowler lbowler Feb 27, 2014An interesting article in Mindshift asks "If robots will run the world, what should students learn" (http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/04/if-robots-will-run-the-world-what-should-students-learn/) The answer proposed is that schools should be teaching metacognition - the intellectual tool that guides "resilience, innovation, adaptability, wisdom, ethics, curiosity, how to ask good questions, synthesizing and integrating information, and of course creating". Educators and researchers have been talking about how to "teach" metacognition for over three decades and now is the time to apply this knowledge about metacognition and learning on a big scale. A good first step is to change assessment instruments. Metacognition can't be assessed with a five-point Likert scale.




VOTES: - brumbaugh brumbaugh Mar 3, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014 - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014 - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014
- Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014
- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014
- paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014

3. Net Neutrality [user:jmorrison|1392935417]]


http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/29/19neutrality.h33.html

(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
The court ruled that the Federal Communications Commission, the agency that regulates interstate communication, does not have the legal authority to prevent telecommunications providers—such as Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon—from blocking the delivery of lawful online content or discriminating against certain kinds of content providers.
While predicting the consequences of the ruling requires weighing a number of hypotheticals, consumer-rights organizations worry that it will give telecommunications companies much greater ability to charge content providers more to guarantee the faster delivery of data to consumers, leaving others, such as schools, with slower delivery.
Additionally, Internet service providers could conceivably block content from sites they regard as rivals, or broker deals with deep-pocketed companies or organizations to put their content in the fast lane.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/29/19neutrality.h33.html


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Internet providers being able to charge for faster content delivery might impact the speed of content access the school district's have. Being able to block content from rivals would mean not having complete access to what is currently available for student research.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

Net neutrality may kick in as a leadership issue in more than one way. Firstly, the notion of the neutrality and freedom of the internet is a mindset and attitude issue that in my view belongs to the values that modern educational leaders should voice and defend. Secondly, as a part of the pedagogical leadership of school leaders, they should inspire their colleagues to use "the digital commons" in the teaching and learning process.
- oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 26, 2014



(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
School district's still struggle with speed of the internet. any decrease due to this would have a big impact on learning.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?
FCC Seeking a new Path on Net Neutrality- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 23, 2014
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/20/business/fcc-to-propose-new-rules-on-open-internet.html?_r=0
The FCC has made a call for comments. ARL, ALA and EDUCAUSE have released their combined statment. which can be found here:
http://www.arl.org/news/arl-news/3148-arl-ala-educause-urge-fcc-to-develop-net-neutrality-policies-fcc-issues-statement-calls-for-comment - lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Feb 26, 2014

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- ole ole Feb 21, 2014 Interesting and relevant. And scaring as well! Should be followed. The discussion has a huge importance for the whole field we're working in. Will this just take us back to curriculum publishers, (now internet providers) determining what students are supposed to learn? - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 23, 2014
Hopefully the FCC will come through on this. Higher ed associations are concerned. H.E. Assoc. on Net Neutrality
- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Feb 25, 2014
- brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 Biggest worry is that the large telecoms in the United States will get their way and make the Internet a toll road that individuals and other companies will have to pay to gain access to content other than what the telecom decides is important.
I'm holding out hope that the proposed Comcast-Time Warner merger releases the floodgates for localities to finally win out and lay their own fiber and/or Google seizes the opportunity. The scary thing is that capacity is following demand and so the haves and have-nots will separate even further. The difference if you live in Austin versus Houston, for instance, is depressing. Places like Kansas City and Lafayette, La, have experienced booms as a result of cheap, fast connections. - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 25, 2014

I'll be interested to see if this hampers activity in the United States as compared to other countries. Free(er) flow of information in other countries might give organizations in those countries a competitive advantage that US-based organizations will lack. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014



VOTES:


4. Growing Inter-relationship Among the Technologies - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 20, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
My thought here is that perhaps some of the technolgies are connected more to some than they are others. For example could the combination of The Interenet of Things, Machine Learning and Learning analytics be of more value to the learner than any of these standing alone? That perhaps it is time to look at some combiantions that support one another. Also by doing this would we see any patterns in the combination 'types' that are the header list in black on the topics page?


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

The combination of topics might potentially be a better learning tool for students?


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

I have if that is the case that the students might take to it quite easily but the leaders may be left in the dust.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

I am pretty sure that education will be surprised bythe availabilty because we don't plan that far ahead.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.

Appreciate the idea and thinking…we need to ponder this. - michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 25, 2014

I agree that this is a trend. Not sure if it fits my idea as a challenge. - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 25, 2014

Me too - ole ole Feb 26, 2014
Ditto - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 27, 2014




VOTES:
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014
- ole ole Mar 4, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014
- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

5. The EdTech Backlash - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014



(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).

As Pogo once said: "We have met the enemy, and he is us." You don't have to Google to find evidence of this trend. The backlash against online learning in general and MOOCs in particular is obvious. For the renewed resistance against educational technology integration in general, you have to read between the proverbial lines except for objections to certain hardware or software, such as tablets.

http://edf.stanford.edu/readings/mooc-backlash
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/03/us-usa-education-online-idUSBRE8920J420121003
https://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-12-27-michael-horn-there-is-going-to-be-a-backlash-against-tablets

It's 2014, and you'd think we'd be over this by now. But educators are once again worrying about being replaced by computers. Or maybe they never stopped and it's surfacing again now because of the popularity/publicity re: MOOCs, tablets, etc. Instead of stating the problem ("We're afraid for our jobs") so that it can be dealt with, educators are instead attacking the technology itself.

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

This could be disastrous. When teachers badmouth technology, what are administrators and other pursestring controllers supposed to think? All the existing prejudices against technology will be fueled by this resistance. "Yeah, we always thought online learning was no [darn] good. Now when Dr. Bigshot says so, it must be true." No, Dr. Bigshot is a tenured professor who fears his university will dump him in favor of online classes.
If this kicks in, impact on policy may be severe. The burden of evidence has at times been perceived as overwhelming and unfair, and an edtech backlash will naturally increase the policymaking gap we have seen times and again. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 2, 2014

(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

See (2).

(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

If we thought selling edtech integration was tough before, picture having your colleagues and supervisors actively undermining everything you're trying to do! You know, as opposed to passively undermining, as they've been doing. ;)

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?

No, but we need to start a "backlash against the backlash"...like the one Common Core supporters are mounting against the anti-CC propaganda:
http://www.questia.com/library/journal/1G1-352751587/backlash-against-the-backlash-the-opposition-to-common


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
I think that the so called backlash, is nothing more than an inevitable re-dress of the balance of the online vs face to face debate. I have also seen it begin to emerge but take it as an expression of the desire to find value in the on campus component of the higher education experience, acknowledging that for some more wealthy few, this will always be a viable option. I'd suggest though that even in this context it will need to be ICT enhanced and that we also have to consider and cater for the wide community for who this costly option is not an alternative- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014
- We can sometimes be our own worst enemies here if those of us who are early adopters are too obnoxious about the latest tech and go on and on about it - this is fine with other geeks but with general educators turns people off - these conversations needs to be about the task not the tool - jnxyz jnxyz Feb 23, 2014 - ole ole Feb 24, 2014 Absolutely - important challenge. - michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 25, 2014Agree.
- mgriffi mgriffi Feb 24, 2014an important part of this will be balancing our our rhetoric rather than just creating backlash. With the emergence of MOOCs especially, we have seen a tremendous amount of VC and consequently advertising going toward promoting these technologies as the future of education. For our part in academic technology, we have been quick to adopt these narratives because they are exciting to us. Part of our role is to balance the interests and insights of our faculty against the role our institutions are to play moving forward. MOOCs are going to mean very different things for different institutions and we have to keep that in mind as we move forward. Of course some folks and institutions will see this move as threatening (because it is), but we have to work from within those fears to help build synthesis.
Don't let MOOCs become synonymous with Educational Technology. MOOCs are just one facet of a very complex matrix of tools and intellectual possibilities. That said, the backlash is all too true. Same old song, 15th (or so) verse. I guess we just keep trying and pushing and pulling and see if anything good actually happens. - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 2, 2014




VOTES: - brumbaugh brumbaugh Mar 3, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014 1 Vote- holly holly Mar 4, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014
- Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014
- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014
- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014
- paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014

6. The Digital Divide - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).

Here's the definition I like best, from WhatIs.com:
The term 'digital divide' describes the fact that the world can be divided into people who do and people who don't have access to - and the capability to use - modern information technology, such as the telephone, television, or the Internet. The digital divide exists between those in cities and those in rural areas. For example, a 1999 study showed that 86% of Internet delivery was to the 20 largest cities. The digital divide also exists between the educated and the uneducated, between economic classes, and, globally, between the more and less industrially developed nations.

Just found this article:
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/02/demand-for-computer-science-classes-grows-despite-digital-divide/

It serves as an important reminder that the Digital Divide isn't just about hardware/software...or even Internet access...it's a distribution of people too. However, hardware/software can help with access to experts.
Digital divide can go along several lines. Today, digital divides is no long only about access, it is - seen globally - also about the ability and the knowledge to use ICT.
- oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

The first thing that has to change is how we determine who's qualified to be a teacher. There is no teacher shortage, only bad policies re: criteria for qualification. Same thing with administrators: we need corporate types to prepare kids for jobs.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

See (2)
- holly holly Feb 26, 2014The digital divide is at its heart an issue about ethics and leadership. Tavani has written extensively and his widely used text "Ethics and Technology" now in it's 4th edition outlines the complexities of this problem in a way that may be useful for NMC in framing this challenge.

(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

The focus has to start with Internet access. Hardware and especially software costs can be kept low if Internet access is the priority. Same goes for personnel budgets. Of course, we're talking about nothing less than abolishing the standard, lecture-style classroom instruction.

Tablets are all the rage these days, but for what you pay for an iPad you can get two Chromebooks. Cheap hardware...mostly free software. With Internet access kids have libraries of information and, as I'd like to set up, a system of online and live computer science classes that could be easily incorporated into a curriculum.
- jnxyz jnxyz Feb 23, 2014 We as educators can always help by researching and demonstrating free apps and free online tools that work across-platform
- holly holly Feb 26, 2014This issue is complex and by it's nature (dividing segments of the population into the "haves" and "have nots") partisan and competitive with people taking sides and justifying positions (more on this in another challenge). For the museum community, a community which is already perceived by many as a community of primarily elite institutions with responsibilities to provide public education about cultural heritage. Efforts to decrease the digital divide by providing technology services is seen as effort to change these perceptions and technology in alignment with the mission to educate and connect audiences with collections are the best of the breed and there are many great examples. There is however a tend towards edutainment in museums (which is not always a bad thing. Edutainment doesn't kill people....) with an element of bread and circuses about it--particularly when interactive tools are segregated in technology ghettos separate from collections, although we are seeing this type of installation less and less frequently with the ever-growing ubiquity of BYOD. One final aspect of this issue relating to museums. With more than 18,000 museums in North America alone there is a huge digital divide between the big museums (big art specifically because that's where most of the money is) and all the little museums who even if they have the necessary content developed cannot afford the technology and tools needed to make collections available--there isn't enough money, manpower, or time, not to mention training. Trustees natter on about "we have to have technology if we are going to get young people through the doors," yet do little to support what it takes to play in this fast-changing world. The multi-millions of dollars spent on proprietary systems which could so easily have been community focused tools is STAGGERING. Collaborative tools that can be easily adopted for use by smaller museums are simply not a concern of the leading museums In this issue museums, particularly big art museums, are more concerned with winning the America's cup than with rising the tide for all ships. (I believe that Dennis Miller would refer to what I have just written as a rant)

Hm. I want to respond to one piece of what Holly said here, which is this thought that "more technology = more young people in the door." There is definitely a perception amongst museums that the technology literacy pretty much breaks down neatly along age or socio-economic lines, and this is not true, in a general sense. Very few of the grad students I teach use Twitter, and a surprisingly large number of elderly visitors to the Denver Art Museum brought iPads with them. Because museums have approached the digital divide in the coarsest way possible, the solution to that problem has generally been to assume that injecting more technology mediation (or more devices, or more opportunities for mediated social engagement) automatically solves that problem. So I'd say that addressing the digital divide is a significant challenge for museums, but I'd also say that defining the digital divide is an even more significant challenge. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?

One of my favorites is the Closing the Digital Divide program underway in Chicago, along with the Smart Communities initiative:
http://mashable.com/2011/04/20/close-digital-divide/



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
It's a complicated and evolving landscape, but definitely include this as a challenge. I think the boundary lines move every time a new tablet or iPhone is released and those who don't have the latest, sleekest, expensive gadget are left out in important ways. Everyone knows in a few weeks who has money and who doesn't on campus. - vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014 That's for sure. - lkoster lkoster Feb 25, 2014
I believe that ICT related technology is a reality that is here to stay and that we will be increasingly expected to respond to it as a part of a broader response to BYOD- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014 Agree - ole ole Feb 24, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014 Agree - lkoster lkoster Feb 25, 2014

On the other side of the coin is the availability of cheap, but usable tech. Ubislate cost £30 ($50), iPad Mini cost £300 ($500). Is the iPad 10 x better? The EdTech types always have the latest gadgets, there's numerous blog posts on Apps for Education, most of these are for iOs devices. Is there an appetite to be brave and break the Apple umbilical cord? - nwitt nwitt Feb 24, 2014

I sense that with the emergence of such inexpensive technology like tablets that the questions based on a financial perspective are less than a few years ago. What if we flip this on it's head, where the issue is less of the newcomers but the older and more entrenched members of our institutions. Our students are coming to us expecting to use their shiny new technology, but faculty and administrators are behind the curve and still using dated systems. Blackberry anyone? - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Feb 25, 2014

I think this challenge needs to be related to the bandwidth challenge above. - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 25, 2014 I agree that we've got to remember that just having a device is not enough. Connection and the quality of that connection has a huge impact on ability to access resources and the time involved differs greatly. Where we are there's still a great difference in access in rural areas and equal access (speed) usually costs more since the only option is satellite. - lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Feb 26, 2014

It might be worth exploring how some internet providers (Verizon, Sprint, others) are approaching this access divide. I know that Qualcomm is also exploring this challenge via its Wireless Reach program as well. - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 28, 2014




VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - brumbaugh brumbaugh Mar 3, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014 1 Vote - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014
- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014 - ole ole Mar 4, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014
- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014
- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014
- paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

7. Resistance to the Changing Role of Faculty and Teachers - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
Although technology is moving quickly, change in the education sector is slow. Education has been much the same for generations and is highly resistant to change. This resistance to change by the educators themselves is likely to slow the transition to new forms of education.


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Currently we are seeing policy push practice due to the practitioners being resistant to change. This means legislators that do not understand education or learning theory are creating decisions about how learning will happen.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
This challenge should be met head on my leaders. Leaders will need to name the challenge and be willing to face the conversation that comes about.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?
Northern Arizona University has a unique model that defines the faculty role quite differently. Not sure this is a solution, but it is one example of how things could look. Look at the student support model.
http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/NG1226.pdf



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- ole ole Feb 21, 2014 Absolutely! This is a big problem also in my part of the world. We addressed the problem in the last Horizon Report, and I do believe that we have to keep the discussion going. Like giving more credit for developing teaching and urge HE teachers to learn more about learning - not least, in this context, what IT offers. - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 21, 2014 Yes, this is even bigger than the EdTech Backlash....you could call this the Progress in General Backlash. ;)
I think that we (as teachers) also have to all recognise that to be a teaching practitioner in a 21st Century institution (and it is 2014 after all) we have no choice but to see the integral link between pedagogy and technology knowledge. It is no longer a valid proposition to claim excellence as a teacher and be technology agnostic, or at least the places where that is so are becoming increasingly fewer. In Australia, what our students, when surveyed, consistently tell us can be paraphrased as: '...your teachers don't use enough technology in their teaching, and when they do, they don't use it well enough.'- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014
- ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014I was happy to see this posted trend and strongly believe it is a current challenge. I am somewhat optimistic (perhaps overly so) that this challenge will be tempered somewhat as the younger teachers, and those now pursuing teaching, mature. Wouldn't that suggest more innovation and acceptance of the newest technology from a population that is at least more familiar with the technology? Granted, the challenge is still to explore and formulate strategies for change but I wonder if the resistance will decrease at least slightly over time.
- mgriffi mgriffi Feb 24, 2014it will be increasingly important for us to provide visible resource of examples for our faculty. Most faculty outside of the school of education, learn to teach by observing their teachers. It would be nice to provide a unified, curated resource that lets our faculty experience the impact of technologically informed teaching outside of the dry reporting on the use of tablets in the classroom and so forth.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014
I see the digital natives moving us forward; it's the policy of testing that is holding us back. Look at the SAT…it still has students write the essay. - michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 25, 2014
As part of this I would add the tenure process and it's dependence on commercial resources and impact factors. A greater willingness to promote open access materials as part of the process would go a long way in helping to transform the nature of scholarly resources, and allow libraries to push back against the expensive increases in electronic materials. - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Feb 25, 2014
Our concept of the Teaching Innovation Lab is geared toward having faculty drive the process of change. Perhaps by taking ownership of the problem, there will be less resistance to change. - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 25, 2014
- holly holly Feb 26, 2014I completely agree that the system needs fixing I think just way this challenge is raised shows an ageist bias that is concerning to me, not that it isn't important to understand changing learning styles but essentially this idea that "our way is the right way" essentially says to people who have dedicated their entire lives to teaching--in a different style that was at one point the "our way is the right way" for an earlier generation--that you are no longer valued. Why does it have to be an either/or? I completely disagree with the statement above that "it is no longer a valid proposition to claim excellence as a teacher and be technology agnostic."
- bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014 I'll add my agreement to this, but with a caveat - as long as the structural incentives line up against innovating in teaching (as underscored by the existing "Relative Lack of Rewards for Teaching") I don't see this particular challenge getting any better.




VOTES: - brumbaugh brumbaugh Mar 3, 2014
- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014
- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014
- ole ole Mar 4, 2014- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014
- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014
- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014
- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014
- paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014
- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

8. Redefining and Promoting Literacy - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 While we have consistently done a good job of documenting the low digital fluency of trainer-teacher-learners, we have yet to focus on the larger issue of redefining digital literacy so we can more successfully foster it. Our traditional view of literacy as something closely associated with reading has expanded to take into account various expansions of the concept, e.g., digital literacy, information literacy, cultural literacy, visual literacy, and financial literacy; we might even consider adding “learning literacy” as a way of describing the skills and abilities needed to learn to learn in our evolving lifelong learning environment. The wicked challenge of redefining something that is so rapidly and continually changing has been well explored in Mozilla Foundation Web Literacy Lead Doug Belshaw’s “What is Digital Literacy? A Pragmatic Investigation” and by learners worldwide through the Educational Technology & Media MOOC (#etmooc) in early 2013. If we don’t adequately define literacy and determine how we can effectively foster it, we will be handicapped tremendously in our efforts to promote educational technology integration in learning to the benefit of learners, learning facilitators, and the communities they ultimately serve.

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 Failing to define literacy in contemporary terms makes it very difficult to set policy that addresses challenges including the low digital fluency of learning facilitators, and makes it difficult for any organization involved in lifelong learning (including K-12, community colleges, higher education, museums, libraries, and workplace learning and performance/staff training) to take full advantage of the digital and other learning resources available to learning organizations.
We need at new debate on what constitutes digital literacy in 2014 and how it impacts and possibly should be included in the curriculum. Digital literacy also affects assessment as well as professional development and initial teacher training. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 2, 2014


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 If leaders in learning organizations are less than clear on what literacy means and implies in contemporary terms, they are not in a position to foster that level of literacy within their organizations and the communities they serve.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 Recognizing that defining contemporary standards of literacy is a continual challenge as our technology and other resources rapidly evolve, we all need to be part of the ongoing process of providing an evolving and inclusive standard of literacy that encompasses reading, technology, learning, and other subcategories of literacy—and we need to include learners in that redefinition process. That’s the prerequisite for successfully fostering the levels of literacy necessary to effectively, creatively, and fully participate in the world we inhabit.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 Doug Belshaw, “What Is Digital Literacy?” A Pragmatic Investigation”:
http://etheses.dur.ac.uk/3446/1/Ed.D._thesis_(FINAL_TO_UPLOAD).pdf

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 Digital Futures in Teacher Education, “Defining Digital Literacy”:
http://www.digitalfutures.org/section/2-2-a-review-of-literature-on-digital-literacy-in-education/

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 Eliza Anyangwe, The Guardian, “20 Ways of Thinking About Digital Literacy in Higher Education”:
http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/blog/2012/may/15/digital-literacy-in-universities

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 #etmooc “Introduction to Digital Literacies” online session facilitated by Doug Belshaw:
https://sas.elluminate.com/p.jnlp?psid=2013-02-18.1200.M.E1C6971D0015BD348DBD143FC183D6.vcr&sid=2008350


- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 21, 2014 Common Sense Media, “Our K-12 Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum”:
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/uploads/educator_blog_pdfs/curr_overview_10.31.pdf

There's a rich vein of resources from the JISC Developing Digital Literacies Programme -
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning/developingdigitalliteracies.aspx - nwitt nwitt Feb 24, 2014

I'd check into UESCO's work in this area. - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 28, 2014


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014 agree strongly. My research has been on video creation and I see complex aspects to video literacy and how it affects success in college and career contexts. Defining each aspect of literacy and then giving examples of high and low levels of literacy can help make a case for why we need to address deficiencies through curricular integration at different levels. If a skill remains unnamed, it is easy to overlook its importance.
I also feel that we are now responding to the requirement to teach for literacies(s). I think that the word literacy should always have the word 'functional' as an adverb. After all, 'literacy' as 'reading' really became a part of a more broadly available education at the school level when the Industrial Revolution created a demand for a 'literate' workforce, i.e. one that could read. Prior to that it was seen very much as to preserve of the elite.- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014 - ole ole Feb 24, 2014 Important discussion that has an impact on quite a few of the other discussions started here.
- ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014Well stated and I agree with all the points! I see one common thread that weaves through all literacies as the critical thinking required when engaging with any content (i.e text, media, visual,etc). In other words, regardless of the content and the rate of that information, the literacies described above start with the user having to filter the information and determining it as the most accurate, timely, useful and ethically-based information possible. I think Clay Shirky's pointabout "filter failure" is an antecedent condition on which many types of literacies are built.
Agreed! Good definitions here help us all chart courses for learning, identify gaps, and set the stage for the prepared learner. - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 24, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Feb 24, 2014I also agree. It seems in these examples we are also talking about the very nature of communication theory, perhaps we would do well to explore Stuart Hall's ideas about encoding/decoding more in the context of this literacy. I agree that critical thought is key, what we need is a subject agnostic platform upon which it can be built.

We took the approach that Digital Literacy needs to be embedded into institutional practice at all levels ( http://technologyenhancedlearning.net/seedpod/ )
Senior manager buy in is essential. Although getting DL included in high level strategy is not a guarantee of impact, no enduring change of this sort is achievable without it. Influencing strategy is impossible unless senior managers can be convinced that your vision has merit. Yet another definition of DL can be found at -
http://hdl.handle.net/10293/1641we developed this in conjunction with students and staff in an attempt to develop an institutionally accepted definition that all would understand and engage with. - nwitt nwitt Feb 24, 2014

- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 2, 2014 (forgot to sign earlier) I am part of an Association of College & Research Libraries Task Force that is working on a new framework for information literacy to replace the current Standards. ACRL Info Lit Draft Framework
I don't know who made this comment related to the ACRL TF, but I've been watching for this update ever since the TF was formed. Very interested in seeing outcome. - lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Feb 26, 2014



VOTES:


9. The Speed of Technology Change, and the Rapid Obsolescence of Hardware


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
there are some of us who still remember when our institutions of higher education were talking about desktop replacement cycles for faculty computers of a new computer every 4 to 5 years the speed of obsolescence of various hardware systems and technology as a backlash affect against me of the new innovations that the technological advances that Moore's law still continues to provide

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?



(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
it has moved the issue of obsolescence and replacement to the individual because of BYOD which causes all sorts of issues around digital divide

(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?

whatever happened to the $100 computer??? and is it any reason that tablets really might get down in price to under $50

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014I see a need to talk also about rapid software changes. Google apps change functionality often without warning and so do other cloud services (Prezi comes to mind). Version number is meaningless in many contexts now, and you cannot hold on to an older version anyhow, but the adjustment process can be unsettling. - ole ole Feb 24, 2014 To use a bromide: We need to teach todays' students in accordance with their future and not our past. So universities - and we - should be very aware og this challenge.
Probably worth reading http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accelerating_change as a jumping off point into this area. IMO, this is inevitable. We need to help people understand how to adapt to change. - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 24, 2014




VOTES: - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014



10. Global Issues Related to Mobile Learning - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
If this is a truly global conversation - then we should begin tackling issues related to developing vs. developed countries. Just discussed at last week's UNESCO Mobile Learning Week event. This includes issues like internet availability, types of devices, challenges to accessing content and providing system PD. Qualcomm has done extensive work in this area. - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?



(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- ole ole Feb 24, 2014
It almost sounds like this might be a new NMC project:)- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014
- ryaros ryaros Mar 2, 2014 Absolutely. Besides developing countries, I think we could also learn much from those who are ahead of us in some aspects of mobility (i.e. Korea).




VOTES: - ole ole Mar 4, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014 - kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014 - Sam Sam Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014

11. Redefining the College Lecture - ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
As noted above, mobile learning is just evolving. While many of us "earlier adopters" cringe at the thought of a large 90 minute lecture void of interactivity and discussion, the fact is many of these larger classes still adhere to the traditional PowerPoint slides projected at the front with students taking notes for the masterly learning of terms and definitions. The challenge, I think, is pursuing a totally different model for larger lectures that will never go way on most large campuses.

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
I think there needs to be candid discussions on campuses that includes those who are not typically engaged with newer technology to explore how today's learners are continuing to change and why it's important to reconsider the traditional lecture model. Many freshman coming to campus bring with them the experiences of more active learning. Expecting them to adjust to the the passive lecture model practiced by professors who have been teaching for years is unrealistic and can be counter productive.

A policy issue here is that we should invest sufficient resources in assessing the pedagogical impact of other teaching strategies - flipped classroom etc. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 2, 2014


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
This trend/challenge, if addressed, would drastically change college lectures because it replaces a "passive lecture and note-taking" environment (even those that use random clicker polls, etc.) with the requirement for instructors to strategically plan several "learning segments" with learners and their mobile devices. So, instead a lecturer providing students with the sustained freedom of pursuing other content not related to the content of the class, instructors "fill" all of those periods with much more continuous interactivity, discussions, web examples, brief quizzes, etc. for more sustained user attention during the entire face-to-face meetings.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?

http://hms.harvard.edu/transforming-lectures-strategies-interactive-large-group-learning- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014

http://cbees.utdallas.edu/wits/files/Mellon_final.pdf


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
I think this relates back to resistance to change. I can't help but think that more prep time would have to be allotted for implementing more interactive classes. (and it would require complacent teachers who never change their lessons from year to year to actually do some planning) - lkoster lkoster Feb 25, 2014
- ole ole Feb 26, 2014 Important perspective and in keeping with some of the other issues addressed so far. But I like the very down-to-earth way of looking at one way of delivery instead of getting too general and talking about teaching in general. So let's go for it - it is very much needed since the traditional lecture is not a good way of learning but used all over the world without changes whatsoever. Research shows that students only remember 20-40 per cent of the key points of a lecture, and if they don't work with the topics afterward they will remember only 10 % after 3 weeks.
- ryaros ryaros Feb 26, 2014 Just a clarification that for me it wasn't extending my prep time, it was completely replacing the traditional delivery model for content with the newer interactive model. In some cases, it actually took me LESS time to aggregate the available online resources to share with students in real time than it did make those old 35-40 slide PowerPoints.

I think that in many ways the proper addressing of this problem begins with business practice and policy. TED talks (and other variants on the traditional lecture, like Ignite) have been wildly successful largely because they adhere to a formula that works very well in an online environment. In the museum sector, I think more lectures would be shared more broadly if there were a willingness to force lecturers to adhere to a series of commandments the same way that TED speakers are (e.g., don't go over 18 minutes, no bullet points on your slides, don't read your presentation, etc.). - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014



VOTES: - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014


12. Cameras are Everywhere in Museums - sheila.carey sheila.carey Feb 24, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
With the ever increasing numbers of visitors entering museums with smart phones, and in the future, camera enabled wearable technology, this poses a challenge for museums. Often exhibitions have objects on loan from other institutions that have a 'no photographs' policy, and art museums in particular have copyright restrictions. At the same time, visitors to museums frequently want to take photographs of themselves and objects in the museums and more and more visitors enter museums with cameras with them on their devices. The best summary of both pro and con arguments is this one:
http://exhibitdev.wordpress.com/2013/12/08/tilting-at-windmills-part-three/


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Museums may need to reconsider their restrictive policies regarding photography, but this could be an issue negotiating loans and copyright. They can't ask visitors to not bring their devices in; it is going to be increasingly difficult to stop people from taking photographs, no matter how many signs you post. One aspect of this will be that museum policy makers will need to think about wearable technologies like Google Glass as well. Will they allow visitors in with Google Glass?

I'd go even further with this--visitors are now starting to do on-the-fly 3D captures of objects in museums with their mobile phones. Without the right photography policies in place, this activity won't be able to flourish. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

This is a great challenge for museums, and should absolutely be included. I think that once photography policies evolve, all sorts of new interactions will be available. #museumselfies could be included as part of the ongoing scholarship and record-keeping for an object, for instance.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.

This is also true for individual privacy reasons. What about students who have FERPA blocks, or who are being stalked? Will the US Marshals have to provide plastic surgery as part of witness relocation, now that facial recognition software is commonplace? - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 25, 2014
Cameras from the users, plus cameras everywhere pointing onto the users (security, traffic, monitoring). So much video, so little knowledge about collection and proper care. VERY scary! - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 2, 2014



VOTES: - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014

13. Immediate Migration to an Online Presence Due to Catastrophes - michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 25, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
Catastrophes happen: nuclear reactors in Japan, SARS in Hong Kong, tsunami/typhoons across the Pacific, Hurricane Katrina, acts of terrorisms, shifts in weather patterns, and others. These disasters disrupt learning; often resulting in 'no schooling' for weeks, months and in many cases, relocation. The challenge is how do we continue creating a strong learning environment in the midst of the crisis.


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
There is the Common Core standards. Therefore, how can any educational institution design policies that will alter the learning environment quickly for a student. Schools need to have in place their own 'mobile learning' space readily available. This is a complex issue but it is one we need to begin thinking about…just my opinion.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
We need model programs in place. For example, the UN has programs in place for refugees–housing, food supplies, medical equipment, etc. Thus, how can 'we' do the same for education?


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

This will keep the educational platform alive/moving for the student. There may be abrupt stop to learning…but a policy could reduce the length of time away from learning for the student.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members
I agree. This should have been done K-12 years ago. but when we bring it up part of the district's disaster plan it falls on deaf ears.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 26, 2014




VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014 - Sam Sam Mar 4, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014 - Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014 - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014


14. The Decline of Liberal Arts and Humanities - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 25, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
As higher ed is increasingly seen less as an avenue for personal enrichment and more as a means to get a job, students are focusing on "marketable" degrees. Online schools trumpet job placement over personal growth. I worry that we will have an increasing divide between the people who chose a liberal arts education and those whose undergraduate focus was marketing. It can also be challenging to teach liberal arts courses online, especially when student engagement and conversation are key. Auto-graded writing may work to some extent, but it currently detect nuance, or appreciate poetry. Are liberal arts majors doomed to life as baristas, while the computer science majors write code without appreciation of the human experience?


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
We have seen a steep decline in Arts and Humanities majors at Harvard, and out Dean is quite concerned. Economics and Government are the two largest programs now.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- ole ole Feb 26, 2014 Quite a challenge - and you're right. Of course this has also to do - at least in my part of the world - with some inertia within the humanities against redefining themselves in accordance with the development. But on the other hand there often is not much room for the arts. - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 26, 2014 Meanwhile, jobs requiring technical skills go unfilled:
http://moneymorning.com/2013/07/29/u-s-unemployment-three-million-jobs-in-america-are-waiting-to-be-filled/
- bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014 The Dean of our School of Management recently published an article addressing why liberal arts majors should be sought after in the business world - perhaps this can be of some use in motivating more undergrad business majors to spend time in the humanities?
http://enewsline.aacsb.edu/deanscorner/boynton

http://www.kqed.org/a/forum/R201311191000- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 28, 2014



VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014 - Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014
- Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

15. Working With Evolving Concepts of Privacy


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
In many ways, it seems as if traditional concepts of privacy are hardly worth discussing, but what New York Times columnist Joe Nocera calls “a privacy crisis” in his article “The Wild West of Privacy” (February 25, 2014, p. A23, Op-Ed section) reminds us that we are still very much in the middle of defining what privacy means in a world where affinity databases document our preferences, we willingly post everything imaginable in social media sites, and federal employees in the National Security Administration have been deliberately punching holes in online security systems for more than a decade, as documented in The Times and elsewhere. Privacy is an issue that is likely to become increasingly important in training-teaching-learning as we gather more personal information about learners through learning analytics tools; consider the benefits and disadvantages to tracking lifelong learning through a central, secure online platform supported by a variety of learning organizations; and see increasing numbers of learners document their activities through online learning platforms. Nocera suggests that privacy legislation could include regulation of data brokers, punitive consequences for those involved in data breaches, and greater transparency regarding who is collecting data and how that data is being used; it may be worth tracking how this legislation would affect learning organizations and the learners they serve.


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Any discussions and legislation regarding the use of data-collection techniques will affect any learning organization (K-12, community colleges, higher education, museums, libraries, and workplace learning and performance—staff training—programs).


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Leadership needs to not only keep up with the evolution of attitudes toward privacy and legislation addressing data-collection practices, but also to be part of the conversation shaping our approach to privacy in learning organizations.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Privacy considerations, practices, and legislation will all affect how we implement learning analytics tools, collect and release information about the learners we serve, and create learning opportunities that prepare our learners to work safely and effectively within contemporary learning environments.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?
The “Privacy in the Age of Ubiquitous Technology” article I wrote for the New Media Consortium blog (published November 11, 2013) includes links to several resources documenting aspects of the challenge and ends with the suggestion that organizations such as the New Media Consortium are in a position to facilitate the search for solutions:
http://www.nmc.org/news/privacy-age-ubiquitous-technology


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.




VOTES:


16. Professional Development for Instructors of Underserved Learners in Online Instruction - deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Feb 26, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
Worldwide trends are definitely turning toward online instruction as a cost effective to bring quality education to underserved parts of the world. Instructors are getting the 'push' from administration to put courses and content online, but they lack the skills. Professional development is needed.


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
This global need could afford greater opportunity for online course specialists and instructional design experts in both K-12 and Higher Ed to extend their reach to help these instructors of underserved learners.

In my view, this approach needs careful analysis of how online instruction should be designed to meet the pedagogical needs of underserved learners. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 2, 2014


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?




(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?
I mY have an opportunity to do some professional development training for a small group of ESL instructors in a remote region of Turkey who are interested in getting courses and content online using Moodle.

http://www.washoe.k12.nv.us/staff/21st-century-learning/pd- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 28, 2014
(6) Comments from other Panel Members



VOTES:- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014

17. Death to 180 and 8 to 3 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 1, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
We talk about the factory model and it's limitations to new structures. However, we continue to create 'the calendar' for next year, rather than think about a 5-year plan of how we could redesign it. Mobility is a strong part of the learning equation. Though we are in the 'shifting' mode of looking at blended models of learning, we add courses only to a schedule we believe is 'the way.' Many of us embrace new designs of learning, but the parent community is not ready to challenge itself to a new format.


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Formulas for subsidizes are often built around attendance and enrollment. We need different algorithms that will support student learning in schools. Attendance does not mean 'in a chair, 8 to 3.' The 180-days must be a policy change.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
This will require educating the community about the school's new role and it's operations. We shifted from bookstores to online; we no longer travel to the bank to deposit a check, it's transferred electronically; we rarely go to the library, we carry our gadgets. The challenge for the leadership is 'letting go' and allowing others to steer, not the present system.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
This current practice of 180 and 8 to 3 chains students and teachers. Seems parents want a new design that offers students a full learning program (physical, mental, social) that adjusts to their work-week.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.




VOTES:- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014 - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014
- jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014 - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014

18. The Need for Students to Know the "Rules" for Intellectual Property

- ryaros ryaros Mar 2, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
YouTube videos, graphics and photos are everywhere for students to access. All of my journalism projects require investigations and aggregation of various types of visual information plus other multimedia. I remain amazed about how little students know (or care) about intellectual property when they can "borrow" digital content. Examples to teach/learn include: How can students obtain permission and/or credit the source(s), if that's acceptable. Understanding why some argue that even LINKING a site that already infringes on the work of others exposes liability to the "linker." In addition, what about class-generated content that is appearing publicly on Tweets, blogs, etc.? What rights do students have when asked to use social media for class purposes?

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
A broad discussion across all levels of educators who depend on technology would help to clarify the best practices for making sure students know and respect current legal requirements as students seek, select and share content, which many do daily. I suspect an initiative to make more people aware of these concerns could affect policies at individual institutions, but that doesn't mean all professors - and certainly students - know about the policies and the law.

(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Instructors who are knowledgeable about the LEGAL aspects of the digital world can take the leadership in their classes to make sure students do not continue treating online content as they do the downloading of music from peer to peer sharing sites. This means how students assemble content OUTSIDE of class (at home) for assignments.

(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Another possible impact would be for projects and deliverables online (one of my classes uses iBooks Author to produce an eBook) to follow the protocols that reduce or avoid infringements and potential liability to the institution.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 2, 2014 I think this is an important education component for all members of the information society and something that will be useful in students' professional life after they graduate. I think the most constructive way this can be taught is to combine an understanding of using others' intellectual property with an understanding of how a student wants to consider intellectual property he/she creates. Teaching about copyright, trademark, licensing and also about Creative Commons is really valuable.

This is actually a huge issue amongst staff at museums. Most quote-unquote content producers (curators, conservators, educators, etc.) are at best dimly aware of IP issues, at worst have never even heard of a CC license. This is certainly true of museum directors as well, which means that appropriate policy is not being created to encourage new types of content development, or to ensure that existing content is licensed in a way that enables its dissemination. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014

Issues of ownership and appropriate use are HUGELY important at any institution, especially those in higher education. Not only are students poorly informed about the balance of use and ownership - faculty and staff seems just about as uninformed. We're really pushing digital scholarship coupled with copyright understandings to improve the level of understanding. - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 2, 2014




VOTES: - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014

19. Digital fluency Amongst (Museum) Staff Remains Low - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
Digital activities inside museums (web, social media, collaborative scholarship, etc.) are still considered the domain of a highly specialized subset of staff members. As a result, the traditional "content producers" of the museum sector (curators, scientists, conservators, educators) have been slow to embrace these new skills and digital literacy amongst these constituencies remains dangerously low. This has had the collateral effect of causing many of these activities to remain locked into a marketing/communications mindset.


(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

If digital fluency were considered to be an essential component of any and all new hires made, the nature of the way museums appear on the web would change overnight.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

Museums that recognize digital fluency as a critical skill for each and every staff member will be the first to realize the accelerative effects of technology and will quickly become leaders in the field.

(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.


*END OF CHALLENGES VOTING*



New Challenges Proposed by Panel that Overlap with Existing Challenges (not eligible for voting)

What’s in it for the faculty? Administrative (tenure/performance review) support for addressing/incorporating/using technology. - lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Feb 26, 2014 [Editor's Note: Great new dimensions to add to existing challenge of "Integrating ICT into Teacher Education.)


(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
What I see as a major challenge has many elements of aforementioned topics including items on the existing challenges list (Digital Fluency of Faculty is Too Low and Relative Lack of Rewards for Teaching) as well as topics introduced here including “Resistance to the Changing Role of Faculty and Teachers,” “Redefining The College ‘Lecture’,” “Keep on Keeping On,” and “speed of technology change.” I want to take the conversation a step higher. Faculty are humans too and there’s only so much time in the day. When our systems of recognition and professional growth fail to include so many of these topics that we as technologist value and see as important, how do we get the buy in? I’ve worked with some great people who say things like “I want to do this even though it takes XXX much of my time and does nothing for me” and "I can't do that since I don't have tenure yet." In the last semester, I've had three faculty get really excited about incorporating multimedia assignment, sit down with me, plan them and come back and say they had to cancel b/c they didn't have administrative support for the change to the learning objectives/syllabus/etc. That's a problem. Don’t get me wrong, I do think there’s blame that falls on faculty who are unwilling to change, but change is hard. Facilitating change that does not earn an individual anything is almost impossible.

I agree with many of the arguments found in those topics, such as issues relating to ownership, adaptation to change, the need to address rapid software changes, and getting those “not typically engaged with newer technology” into the conversation. I think Brett Bixler has made a great point in his comment “We have to embrace the best of technologies with the understanding that the lifespan of any particular one may be measured in single digit years, and a better solution is just around the corner. It's not enough for an educator to embrace this concept - administrators, staff, and students must also do so.” So that's the challenge, how do we establish value, meaning value to the individual teacher/faculty member, in a our current models of tenure/promotion/performance review? While the argument that "this is where the world is going" and "that's just the way students learn now" are correct, we have to address the bigger issues of the systems in which we exist.

Note: I'm a librarian running a student media production center in an HE institution.

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
What we value for academic positions has to change if we want our faculty to change. We can't just keep saying you have to do this, but there's nothing in it for you. I also think it could help address the issues around "who's job is it" to teach literacy, to teach critical thinking, and all of the rest of the things we've been talking about this week relating to the non-content needs of our students.


(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
The change would have to come from the top and the faculty as a body. Downward push would not be enough because of the relationship of peer feedback in the tenure process particularly.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?
Specific to DH:
https://www.mla.org/guidelines_evaluation_digital
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/closing-the-evaluation-gap/


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
I agree completely - motivation for tenured and not-yet-tenured faculty is critically important. It's easy for those (of us?) who are excited about changes to teaching and learning to push for more adoption. What's not easy is persuading the faculty that it's worth the time and effort and that their work will be recognized by those who review and evaluate their work. At our school, an increased focus on research has taken the focus off of teaching and back on faculty publication. Those changes don't facilitate the challenges of changing how teachers teach in the classroom. - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 2, 2014




Other Notes and Perspectives from Panel Members that Don't Quite Fit in as Challenges (not eligible for voting.)


Keep on Keeping On. - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014
(1) Please define this challenge below (4-5 sentences).
I think a big challenge is for all of us being able to be inspired to keep on pushing forward. I am so inspired by this commercial. It makes me feel united and purpose driven.
http://news.yahoo.com/video-microsoft-surprised-us-best-commercial-super-bowl-143629056.html

Dealing with the challenges listed is a constant challenge in most of our lives. Working toward the bigger picture for all to come together is difficult.
And, I would not change this challenge for anything.

(2) How might this challenge impact policy for the learning sector you know best?



(3) How might this challenge impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

I think I already said this once, but sometimes I think educators think more about what they cannot do, than what they can do. We need good leaders in education, with vision, who embrace systemic processes that will move us forward.


(4) How might this challenge impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?

http://campsnowball.org/

http://watersfoundation.org/the-benefits/overview/


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.

This makes me think of "technological inertia," the desire to stay on one course with one technology just because it is easier to do so. Easy = less money, less time, less brainpower. We have to embrace the best of technologies with the understanding that the lifespan of any particular one may be measured in single digit years, and a better solution is just around the corner. It's not enough for an educator to embrace this concept - administrators, staff, and students must also do so. - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 25, 2014 Good point! - ole ole Feb 26, 2014