Question 1: What key trends are missing from our list?

Instructions: Please use the prompt below to help you consider what might need to be added to the current list of Horizon Trends. Add your thoughts below, using a new entry for each new key trend.

*Please add your comments to your peers' new entries if you agree or disagree or wish to add a different perspective/elaborate.* If you have general comments to make on another Panel member's entry, please add them to the end in Section (6).

What would you list among the key trends that are accelerating educational technology adoption at some or many educational institutions today that arguably ALL institutions should be paying attention to?

Each new trend entry must include a title, a description similar to the ones that are written now, and, if needed, a rationale as to why it is different from any of the existing trends. Additionally, there are a few prompts designed to gather other pertinent information about the topic, such as its implications for policy, leadership, and practice; and any projects (even in the initial or research stages) that you know of that involve the trend added.

Please "sign" your contributions by marking them with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples -- like this: - Sam Sam Feb 11, 2014

If you have entered in a brand new topic, please make your signature next to the title of the topic.



VOTES: - Sam Sam Mar 3, 2014

1. Unity of Theory and Practice in the Creation of Digital Objects - mgriffi mgriffi Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
This is a synthesis of several other trends, that seems to be emerging in its own right.
The increasing unity of theory and practice in the creation of digital objects. The increased presence of maker tech does not just figure the student as a creator or remixer, but as an emerging academic practicing their voice within the tangible. There is a direct connection between theory and practice in these spaces. Students have the ability to challenge object narratives through the creation of new objects.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Institutions must provide for students the spaces necessary to create these narratives, both in terms of physical space equipped for these narratives and academic space to explore their theoretical explorations.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
This is a shift in student production that must be supported from the top, these spaces while increasingly less expensive, still cost a bit and need to be maintained, stocked and staffed. It is not enough to just have a maker space, that space must be presented in a way that fosters this type of development.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
It is a new way of looking at student and will require a new means of evaluating and assessing student work. New pedagogies will emerge to push students toward the moment of praxis rather than keeping them in the moment of the theoretical.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
Groups like the FAT and their universal construction kit are a good example.


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- jnxyz jnxyz Feb 20, 2014 I would heartily support an emphasis on this, and see it in some ways as an outworking of the goals of Blooms taxonomy, project based learning, challenge based learning and even the SAMR model - those all having an emphasis on moving to student centred creation of content.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014 - lbowler lbowler Feb 21, 2014 Is the unity of theory and practice related to Pellegrino and Hilton's ideas about deeper learning (See: Education for life and work: Developing transferable knowledge and skills for the 21st century, 2012)? Am I interpreting this correctly? Or are you referring to the application of a specific theory or set of theories to practice (i.e. applying a critical theory perspective to making). Just want to situate this a bit. - vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014 This has emerged in the library context as we discuss changes in researcher behavior with a more iterative approach - theorize, collect data, write a bit, go back to theorizing, collect more data, write some more, stop, rest and repeat. Linear (or chunked) research behavior is less common over time.
I'm not convinced that the notion of students producing (prod/users) in the context is a particularly new one. In fact I'd say that students have always 'produced' outcomes, often in terms of 'product' or a 'performance' for me its more a question about the role and value of 'authentic learning' and 'authentic assessment'- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014- holly holly Feb 24, 2014I concur this seems to be about mediation in the process.
Agree that I'm not convinced this is new in certain fields like engineering or architecture. I think the trend is that this type of "making" is being extended to new areas - I have seen an example in environmental science and this technology is being used a lot in the arts. - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Feb 25, 2014 A small number of academic libraries are adding Makerspaces that are accessible to all sectors of the campus - NC State U., U. Nevada, Reno, are two examples. - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Feb 25, 2014 Would this be an extension of what is going on with the "Design Thinking" projects at Stanford or "Project Based Learning" that is being promoted by the Buck Institute? - brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014





VOTES:- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014 - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014 - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014




2. The Growing Digital Industrial Revolution - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 20, 2014


The four trends that follow are taken from this article in Campus Technology.
http://campustechnology.com/articles/2013/12/19/gartner-4-disruptive-trends-changing-the-future-of-it.aspx

Disruption 1: The Digital Industrial Revolution
When, earlier in 2013, a Stratasys printer was used to print out a plastic gun that could be fired multiple times using a design plan that was later made publicly available, the world was on notice that now "we can make things in our basement that used to have to be done in our factories by manufacturers," said Plummer.
In the same period doctors from the University of Michigan printed a "bio-absorbable" plastic device that could hold a child's trachea open, allowing him to breathe normally. "Full resorption" of the new splint is expected to occur within three years. In this new category of usage, called "3D bioprinting," 3D printers can produce human cells and organs to replace malfunctioning ones.
Both types of uses for 3D printing are stark symbols of the "digital industrial revolution," Plummer noted, which, like the first industrial revolution, is "shaping up" to change the way we build things, what we do for work, where we live and how we thrive in the areas of family and health.
The impact of 3D printing alone will have "wide-ranging effects," Plummer said. Besides the obvious need for reassessment of laws regarding how 3D-printed weapons will be controlled in the world, for example, there will also be a movement away from manufacturing for economies of scale to manufacturing as a one-off proposition.

That in turn could alter Chinese economic might, he added. "Economies of scale have pushed China to a position of economic power that is almost unheard of in the modern world. That is going to be affected by the subject of 3D printing. What happens when we can print those things that were manufactured in China in our basement or in a little store down the street, where we all go and print them on demand? What happens when the manufacturing, the distribution and the logistics chains all collapse into themselves?"
Another area of impact: copyright. 3D printing, which uses product designs that exist in digital form, will become an easy way to counterfeit physical goods. By 2018, Gartner predicts, 3D printing will result in the loss of at least $100 billion globally per year in intellectual property.
Just as biomedicine has had to sort out the ethical arguments regarding the use of human stem cells, Gartner predicts that by 2016, the medical community will grapple with a "global debate about regulating the technology or banning [3D printing] for both human and nonhuman use," Plummer said.
What impact could 3D printing have on IT? For one, new strategies will be needed to validate whether or not a product is genuine. Also, said Plummer, we'll need better ways to protect the templates and blueprints behind the products we print. Finally, organizations — including research institutions — should expect to develop policies for acceptable research parameters in bioprinting.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
- jnxyz jnxyz Feb 20, 2014 this is definitely a trend that will have a big observable impact on many facets of society unlike some that just permeate slowly. I hadn't thought yet far enough however - the comments above about China and supply chain and logistics companies etc will see major industries change. Hence policies that dictate what subjects are taught in schools or universities need to further change to prepare students for a future where these industries are very different.
The digital industrial revolution may affect policy issues in several ways. Just to mention two areas, I think that the first area is that we need to reframe what we mean by artifacts for learning. The 3D-printer may be the be one of the most prominent examples in later years. Secondly, work processes and organization around learning may have to be rethought. I don´t know, maybe we will see a renessaince of the studio model of learning. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
I think a big impact in K-12 leadership would be the need to totally reframe "classroom".


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
- jnxyz jnxyz Feb 20, 2014 In education I can see a great opportunity for the democratisation of manufacturing to be opened to students to be designers and makers so that when say Amazon opens its store for downloading designs that you print at home, they are positioned to participate rather than just consume. - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 20, 2014 I foresee an increased demand for intellectual property lawyers. ;)
- holly holly Feb 24, 2014
http://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/will-3d-printing-spark-a-green-manufacturing-revolution.html
- paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Feb 25, 2014 The library makerspace movement is in full swing, and with the movement away from physical collections to library as place, this may provide an emerging service for engagement and experimentation. However, even with diminishing emphasis on print, electronic resource inflation is sky high - so who is going to pay for the creation and sustainability of such spaces? Can libraries actually invest enought for this to be a worthwhile academic pursuit, or just another expensive service?

The way this trend is defined here is interesting. 3D printing, in a general sense, seems likely to become an important part of museum educational practice in the very near future, particularly as costs go down. However, the framing of this trend (getting at the revolution in manufacturing) is one that museums have not yet begun to address in any real meaningful way. An area where this revolution in "boutique" manufacturing will be felt most acutely is in objects conservation. Particularly with variable media objects, acquiring mass-manufactured parts has always been problematic, particularly when the manufacturers go out of business. The ability to simply replicate replacement parts completely revolutionizes the conservator's approach. This also means that the way objects are documented by registrars will have to change as well (keeping records that detail how parts could be made is significantly different from simply cataloguing manufacturers and part numbers). - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140203-japanese-government-to-fund-3d-printing-in-education.html


http://www.3ders.org/3d-print-technology.html


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- lbowler lbowler Feb 21, 2014 I think the next step in "maker spaces" and the maker movement, in terms of education, is move beyond procedural knowledge (i.e. how to use the soldering iron or how to code an arduino) and start thinking about developing in learners a set of critical technical practices. If we think of technological artifacts as tools for communicating the maker's intentions, then we need to expand our notion of media literacy to include critical technical practices. Makers need to ask themselves questions that go beyond "how do I do this?". They need to ask self-reflective questions about the consequences of their designs on themselves and on society. How to do this is available anywhere, as content knowledge. There are so many ethical and value questions that need to be answered in a thoughtful and collaborative manner. Unintended consequences can affect the success of innovative creations. - lori.swinney lori.swinney Feb 25, 2014
I think that the next trend IS teaching kids to code. - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014
I also think that in many ways this plays into the 'competency-based' approach to learning and teaching, quite common in vocational education but less so within the higher education context. I am intrigued though by how far the notion of 3D printing might go when we start to develop new materials to print with(?)- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Feb 24, 2014 I would add to this the nature of the digital items themselves. The fabrication process will leave clues as to the origin of the objects. What is the difference in cultural/educational value of the 3D printed object as compared to the "actual" object. A 3D printed gun, is not just a gun, it is also a complex signifier of a new understanding of material relations.

- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 24, 2014
In addition, schools are focusing much of their time/resources/money on the development of curriculum. Monies and resources also need to be aimed at adding equipment/spaces that students will have access to use. Virtual labs are critical.
The Smithsonian has an excellent website featuring their 3-D work with many examples of their use in understanding artifacts. They also had a great conference (videos are available) on this topic. 3d.si.edu - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Feb 25, 2014
How are we preparing our students for this environment? They can no longer be the manufactured. They have to be the manufacturers. That's a different skill set than our industrial education models usually produce. - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 26, 2014
In our own MakerSpace initiative, we have been talking about the even greater impact of laser cutters. They can give kids even quicker feedback and more kids can use them at the same time. But we are starting with 3D printing because it's so cool and accessible. I totally agree with all that's been said. - cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014




VOTES:- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014 - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014
- Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014

3. Rise of Digital Business - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Disruption 2: Digital Business
The enterprise has begun to "accessorize" its operations with digital assets and capabilities. Activities formerly done by people or on paper or with a simple computer program are now being handled through digital accessories "We're moving from a world where people behave the way computers work and entering a world where computers work the way people behave," Plummer explained. "The machine follows you. The machine does it the way you want to do it. The machine anticipates your expectations and gives you your sense of comfort rather than you having to sit at a certain machine or a certain network. That's what digital business is all about."
In this new world, for example, the digital use of crowds through crowdsourcing begins to play a larger role in new initiatives. Crowds will help figure out what projects should be undertaken, and they'll help fund those efforts through Kickstarter-like mechanisms. The technology for supporting crowdsourcing endeavors is getting better, Plummer said, citing the ready availability of platforms that allow people to provide input and get feedback in real time within organizations.
What CIOs have to start thinking about, he said, is how to use crowds inside their own organizations to solve business problems. "Instead of building teams of people that are pre-structured, why not start thinking about using ad hoc teams? Set up the subject, the questions you're trying to answer. Get them out into a social environment like a Yammer and say, 'Hey, let's get the crowd's opinion.'" But making the software available isn't the end of the work, he added. It will also require "building the right culture to support this bottom-up contribution." Without "employees who care," these social business initiatives are likely to fail.
The digitization of the enterprise is also treading into issues of personal privacy. "You can go on Facebook and find out more about a person today than you could with months of study 40 years ago," Plummer said.
That leads to an interesting conjunction. On one hand, consumers will increasingly begin to "collect, track and barter their personal data" in exchange for cost savings, convenience and customized offerings. On the other hand, digital security of personal data is getting more difficult for organizations to guarantee.
In that regard, noted Plummer, Gartner predicts that by 2020 enterprises and governments will fail to protect three quarters of sensitive data and will therefore "declassify and grant broad and public access to it." While that prospect may be considered "blasphemy" in the IT world, he stated, it's backed up by current practice. IT departments are in the habit of calling much of the data under their care and management "sensitive." The reality is that "we treat all of it as sensitive because we don't have the money or time to separate it out."
To demonstrate what he meant, Plummer called into question a statement such as, "Our medical data is sensitive." "All of it? Really? Are you telling me the stuff individuals are sharing on their own social sharing sites is sensitive when you have it, but not when they share it in a social community?"
In reality, the growth of data "exceeds the protective mechanisms we have for it," he said. "If we try to protect it all, we will fail. And by the way, we are already failing. We are not protecting the sensitive data we think we are protecting."
A better approach for ensuring protection, Plummer advised, is to establish what truly is sensitive data and figure out how to share the other information for political or economic advantage.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know.
Blocking internet sites and protection of student data is a big priority for K12 education in part due to the requirement that schools that receive E-rate funding must have and internet filter.
http://www.iste.org/learn/publications/learning-leading/issues/l-l-december-january-2013-14/point-counterpoint-is-it-time-to-stop-filtering-the-internet-at-school-


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
At a point K-12 will have to face that it cannot continue to function away from the rest of the world. The growth of digital will deal K-12 another blow they are not now prepared to handle. The conversation around preparing our schools and our students for this should begin now.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
https://www.diversityinc.com/resource-groups-2/resource-groups-improve-media-companys-digital-business-by-350/

Video is the voice of the students.
http://www.stern.nyu.edu/experience-stern/news-events/higher-ed-digital-age?src=homepage_feature


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- sbedard sbedard Feb 22, 2014 i like the direction of this topic where education needs to work in harmony with the real world as in not blocking sites, but reaching digital literacy and citizenship. It is only a matter of time that the need to work together for positive change emerges in the schools.
I definitely see CRMs system as having increasing importance. Like it or not, there is/will be an increasing amount of data about us out there, and it will be harder to evade the fingers of the digital realm. Is Zuckerberg right? Is privacy dead? - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 23, 2014 - ole ole Feb 24, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Feb 24, 2014 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014It seems that inherent in this is the idea of digital identity performance as explicated in Henry Jenkins among others. This is the very basis of participatory culture. Part of the responsibility of educators is to find ways of demonstrating the real consequences of these digital practice. - brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 In referring to the work of Henry Jenkins, it is the participatory culture that allows individuals to leverage the work of others in creative and technical fields to improve upon what has already been done. e.g.: Fan Fiction sites, GitHub, etc. - ole ole Feb 26, 2014

There's a whole lot to unpack here--it feels like there might be several trends here (new team structures, digital replacement of analog practices, crowdsourcing material that was formerly thought of as belonging to the domain of experts, the increasing difficulty of determining what data is "sensitive" and not, etc.) that should be separated out. There is one trend here (that I think I may expand upon in the "challenges" RQ) relating to organizational structures. The emergence of so-called "holacratic" org structures (in which traditional hierarchies are eliminated in favor of ad-hoc teams) such as those being implemented at Zappos are likely to have an impact on organizations that are making attempts to work digitally in a more native or authentic manner. This is still a ways off for our sector(s), but a trend to watch, nonetheless. Here's a good article on Zappos' recent decision to adopt a holacratic structure:
http://qz.com/161210/zappos-is-going-holacratic-no-job-titles-no-managers-no-hierarchy/. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014
In studying social phenomena, we see crowds tend to self moderate. It's more decentralized and democratic, where citizenship is practiced.- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014



VOTES: - brettbixler brettbixler Mar 3, 2014
- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014 - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

4. Rise of Smart Machines - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Disruption 3: Smart Machines
Smart machines are already available that automate decision-making based on data they have accumulated. "They make decisions faster, more accurately, maybe more consistently than we can," said Plummer. As current examples he pointed to cars that park themselves, surgical robots that assist in surgery and auto-pilots that can land a plane in certain situations. "These things are only going to grow. They're getting more possible. They're acceptable. You see commercials with automated assist capabilities all the time. They look cool to us now. As little as 15 years ago, they probably scared us to death."
Gartner predicts that by 2024, at least a tenth of those activities that are "potentially injurious to human life" will require mandatory use of smart systems that can't be overridden by humans. Organizations working in the field of "smart adviser" development will enjoy "substantive competitive advantage," Plummer declared.
The job for CIOs and IT leaders, he added, will be to help identify where and how the deployment of automated systems might improve product safety or enhance competitive attractiveness.
As a follow-on to that, Gartner believes that by 2020 most knowledge workers' career paths will be "disrupted by smart machines in positive and negative ways." On the positive side, personal virtual assistants (think Siri) will be able to handle decision-making for us. On the negative side, a smart machine might be able to prove it could do a worker's job better than he or she can, which could put that person out of work.
One twist to this is that smart machines will need human teachers in order to learn. By 2017, Gartner reported, a tenth of all computers will be "learning rather than processing." People will have to use "deep neural network techniques" to feed those computers patterns of information and developers will need to construct "a lot of programming algorithms" to power the smartness in the machine.
As a result, IT organizations should begin looking for developers who have skills in programming smarter macros and start thinking about how to train developers to train computers — as opposed to programming computers. "That's going to be an interesting transition over the next 10 years," Plummer observed.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

As career paths change students' knowledge base must change also.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

Again, K-12 should be planning for this now.
This might be a way to ease into the conversation now, around what is somewhat is familar to us. and build from there.
http://images.centerdigitaled.com/documents/CDE12+BRIEF+Verizon+K12_V.pdf


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

This is not in English bt you can kind to tell from the video what is happening.
https://www.facebook.com/NUST.SEECS.SMARTLab?ref=stream- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
Is this akin to Amazon anticipating what purchases you would like to make and automatically sending you those items? - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014 Very interesting perspective - ole ole Feb 24, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014




VOTES:

5. The Move Away from User Name and Password - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014

- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Moving away from username and password.
http://www.darkreading.com/end-user/fido-alliance-publishes-authentication-s/240166160


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
- holly holly Feb 24, 2014Twenty years ago the security staff at the museum I worked for kept the 5 digit codes for the storage vaults written on the backs of their name tags. This was NOT in accordance with AAM Best Practices--even for the early 90s. I still see vestiges of this attitude in folks who have their user names and passwords taped to their laptops. While not specifically targeted at a learning sector, museums have good reasons for being security conscious and an alternative that would remove some of the user carelessness would be helpful.- holly holly Feb 24, 2014although another way to view this trend would be less paranoid and more universal. What if images and information were free free free and user names and passwords were no longer necessary because we (museums) took a long viewed towards cultural heritage as belonging to the world (solar system...stellar system...alternative universes).

Having on authentication across services and devises would streamline and speed up use of mulitiple devises.

Is this perhaps an alternative to social security numbers as we move forward?

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

- holly holly Feb 24, 2014If museums were to make information and images universally accessible in the museum world--to all our audiences--user names and passwords would no longer be necessary--and this would make many levels of leadership nervous because of antiquated notions of rights and reproductions (particularly for works already in the public domain).

I'm starting to see more situations in which certain identities are retained when a person moves from one institution to another (which is happening with increasing frequency in the museum sector), whether that be a Twitter profile, a Basecamp account, or whatever. Because many of these identities are somewhat tied to an institutional identity, this could be problematic (or at least interesting to watch) over the long term. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

- holly holly Feb 24, 2014it occurs to me that this might be viewed in a completely different perspective if we were able to make information and images universally accessible in the museum world--to all our audiences--user names and passwords would no longer be necessary and educators across the world might have access to more of the world's cultural heritage.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

- holly holly Feb 24, 2014http://wellcomeimages.org/


http://www.informationweek.com/whitepaper/Security/Application-Security/moving-beyond-user-names-and-passwords-an-overvie-wp1360613019

http://www.slideshare.net/fmarier/the-web-beyond-usernames-passwords-osdc12

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/10/beyond-passwords-new-tools-to-identify-humans/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

SmartPulse
Do you think moving beyond usernames and passwords toward a "multi-factor" authentication standard will make it easier to verify a user's identity?
Yes
79.69%
No
20.31%

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 This is a great acknowledgement of the need to improve the user experience for learners as they/we move across multiple platforms in our learning endeavors. Having a secure (unhackable) single point of entry would be a great contribution to pushing the technology (passwords) into the background a bit and letting learners focus more on the acquisition of resources/information through easier access to what is at the heart of the learning process. (Imagine how nice it would be to not have to re-enter passwords each time we move from one secure site to another through something as simple as a library website and its various portals leading to databases and other online resources.) - ole ole Feb 21, 2014
I also think that on a very simple level this kind of advance could have immense value in aiding accessibility to the online experience(s)- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 23, 2014 My brand new Lenovo laptop has face recognition. I haven't tried it yet! Back in my corporate days, I used a password manager and I'm at the point now where I'm considering using one again. I have a personal Google account, one for the past/current/future schools...all the work/vendor/fun sites...it's getting ridiculous. I'd be very happy with a fingerprint systerm of identifcation.
Possibly I've seen too many movies, but fingerprinting and retinal scans make me nervous in terms of what a criminal might do if he badly wants access to my accounts. - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 23, 2014
This is an important trend to watch for libraries as the different licensing requirements of multiple commercial information providers require a variety of access mechanisms and require a lot of back-end work in libraries and a lot of frustration on the part of users. There has been a significant amount of work on authentication and authorization in the higher education community (especially Intenet2) but there is a long way to go for genuine convenience. - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Feb 25, 2014
- paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Feb 25, 2014 I welcome any change that would improve the users experience, and as we all know the user name/password system is dated and cumbersome. However, changing over is going to have costs, and the ROI will need to be great enough to justify the investment. Until some great standard emerges that can bundle all the related issues - such as privacy, costs, universal access, etc - it may be a ways off.
Wondering if there's a non-threatening non-password solution. Don't want to lose eyes or fingers, but something other than 14 random characters must work. - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Feb 25, 2014




VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014
- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014
- ole ole Mar 4, 2014 - ole ole Mar 4, 2014 (2 votes)- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014 - cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014 - lkoster lkoster Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014

6. Brain-Based Teaching - deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Many educators are using researchers' insights into how children best learn to inform their teaching practices. Stanford professor Carol Dweck's research on encouraging children to develop a growth-mindset continues to grow in popularity, as educators try to praise effort, not outcomes.

Source:
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/10/five-research-driven-education-trends-at-work-in-classrooms/


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?



(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
This kind of philosophical disruption will inevitably shake up the status quo.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
There does seem to be a trend developing moving away from a focus on outcomes (new conversations are springing up about the real worth of standardized testing for college admissions, for example) and more toward *process*.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
"Brainology" Carol Dweck, Stanford
"Brainworks"
- ryaros ryaros Feb 21, 2014At the institutional level, here's a new "scholarship in practice" initiative that emphasizes processes authentic to the discipline for students...

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 This works nicely as a complementary idea in tandem with Ole's topic of "Evidence from the Field of Mind, Brain, and Education" [currently at the top of this list of topics on the Wiki-Thon wiki]. - ole ole Feb 21, 2014 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014Yes, I'm happy to see this input - very interesting and relevant!



VOTES: - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014 - Sam Sam Mar 4, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014

7. Increase in STEM Education/Programs - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014

Could be wrong, but I think this is big enough to be a trend all by itself.

- and you might add STEM/STEAM. - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 23, 2014 Yes, I like that Art is being added to the mix.
I am not saying this should or should not be a trend. Just that if K-12 were doing STEM/Steam correctly it would probably be mainstream by now.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014
In reading Tim Wagner's Creating Innovators, he defends going beyond STEAM or STEM, but helping kids find their passion and purpose through play, in all areas, allowing them to be creative. I am a STEM teacher, but I like this broader mindset better.- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014



VOTES: - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014

8. Student Counseling is Becoming High-Tech - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014


Probably am wrong...many would argue that this belongs under Digital Delivery, Online Learning, etc. I'm seeing lots of evidence for it, but this could just be because of my situation. Used to be that a Mexican kid graduating from our school would go to a Mexican university. No counseling needed for that. But now our students are increasingly interested in attending college abroad, and thus they're taking advantage of websites, consultant services, etc. Yes, I've even taken kids into Second Life to visit the cybercampuses of schools they're interested in!
I think this is very interesting in that it could be applied to ed career positions. Everything will continue to change at a higher pace.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014





VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - brettbixler brettbixler Mar 3, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014- ole ole Mar 4, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014 - cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014 - lkoster lkoster Mar 5, 2014
- Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014 - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014 - Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

9. Evolution of the Textbook: Collaborative Learning Objects as Textbooks - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 Much has been written about online textbooks as well as the increasing use of open resources in learning, but we don’t seem to yet be tracking, through the Horizon Project, cutting-edge models of textbooks that engage learners in the learning process. Some learning facilitators create their own online textbooks by combining open resources into a course text. Some are providing blended learning opportunities by offering typed-text lectures interspersed with links to appropriate online videos and other resources (e.g. PowerPoint decks and educational mangas) in a flipped classroom model that prepares learners for onsite or online application of what is gained from those custom-made textbooks. Wikis that provide initial content and then expand through learners’ contributions move us toward living, evolving textbooks that can be used for a specific course as well as for subsequent courses where learning facilitators and learners build upon what is already available—learners contribute to their field of study through their own course-related creations. A comment from Penn State Associate Instructional Design Librarian John Shank at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia in January 2014 takes us even further: MOOCs, he suggested, may be the textbook of the future in that they bring online content to learners and—particularly in connectivist MOOCs—encourage learning by creation of new content related to the subject area being explored in a course.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 This trend creates a slightly open door to greater engagement on the part of learners not only in setting the agenda for coursework but also for learning by contributing to the learning materials they and others will use. It will also require a major shift in the way we think of textbooks, curate textbooks, and make textbooks available to learners and those facilitating their learning process.
- brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 This could really decentralize what we look at as a "course" or a "textbook" because there will be more content available for free than content that is packaged by a publishing company and sold to schools as a "package" which includes a textbook, ancillary materials, video and simulations. How will departments of education require schools to purchase "standards-based textbooks" when most, if not all, of the same content is available in other areas for low or no cost to the school or student?
In the Norwegian context, evaluations from the latest curriculum reform that came into effect 2006 indicates that we still have a strong textbook culture in my country. This is a barrier to innovation, because the textbook is seen as the norm and the holy grail of content for learning. Sad, but true, there is still need for a lot of awareness raising among policy and decision makers about emerging and open forms of content and educational practices. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 Leadership in K-12, community colleges, higher education, and workplace learning and performance (staff training) will have to rethink what a textbook is, how it fits into the learning process, and how it engages learners.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 If we are willing to see all learning organizations (K-12, community colleges, higher education, museums, libraries, and workplace learning and performance—staff training—programs) as part of a wonderfully vibrant and essential lifelong learning environment, this evolving view of what a textbook is would impact any of us involved in preparing learning materials for learners: it makes us draw learners into the process of creating the materials that foster their learning.
We need to work with teacher training institutions in order to encourage student teachers to familiarize themselves and experiment with various forms of digital content and content curation. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014
- brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 What is going on that is amplifying this process is the increase of OER (Open Educational Resources) sites, like Gooru Learning, Curriki, HippoCampus, OER Commons and others that will provide teachers with a variety of content they can use to "cobble together" their own text book and learning resources for their classes.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 The KQED “Mind/Shift” site offers examples in “Teachers Customize Textbooks Online”
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2010/10/teachers-customize-textbooks-online/

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 The University of Kentucky has a faculty-driven project, as documented in “UK Faculty Participate in Open-source Textbook Project”:
http://uknow.uky.edu/content/uk-psychology-faculty-participate-open-source-textbook-project

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 Frank Neal from the Frankfurt International School, in Germany, writes about a Public Speaking Class textbook his students created:
http://robinbneal.com/2013/04/07/wikis-as-textbooks/

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 My own “Connected Learning, Project-Based Learning, and Learners as Authors” blog posting examines how Norwegian high school students wrote Connected Learners as a learning experience:
http://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/2013/08/20/connected-learning-project-based-learning-and-learners-as-authors/

- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 #etmooc (the Educational Technology & Media MOOC) provides an example of how participants in a massive open online course created an entirely different type of textbook—something that connects learning objects (e.g., blog articles, videos, and other products) across a variety of online platforms; the course hub helps link those objects together as a resource available to others interested in educational technology and media:
http://etmooc.org/

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- ole ole Feb 21, 2014 This is a must, I believe. From a learning perspective this trend hits the bull's eye as it requires activity, supports cognition and meta cognition, is based on peer work and peer evaluation.
I think that this is going to be a difficult conversation to advance based largely upon entrenched self interest of some pretty powerful stakeholders. It just might be one of those where the market forces the change in Clayton Christensen's disruptive terms- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014
The idea that a virtual textbook might not exist in any form until the moment of need is exciting. Imagine a student that has metadata on him/her as a learner, looking for info. on a subject, then having a virtual textbook assembled and appear on the fly, based not only on the subject but on learner preferences and defined needs! - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 24, 2014
I agree that this is a trend to watch and that custom-created "textbooks" with interactive content, created perhaps jointly by students and faculty, is exciting. However I would not underestimate the role of commercial publishers in this environment. I think they are working hard on interactive materials and embedding all types of content in their textbook-like products. Gale Cengage is one player in this arena. See a presentation from a CNI presentation
- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Feb 25, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Feb 25, 2014 i wonder if this is where interactive textbooks that students and teachers create together fit in...ie iTunes U courses and iBook Author
- brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 This could be a major shift for School Administrators, where they will need to become instructional leaders, instead of managers of large institutions. IMHO,this is an area of dire need, since there is a lack of people in the Administrative ranks of schools or school districts who have a good grasp of what is going on and what is possible with the resources that are readily available.




VOTES:- ole ole Mar 4, 2014 - ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014

10. Increase in Video and Voice Communication - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
The increase in online video communication will have a dramatic impact on education. As tools to communicate via video and voice become more easily accessible and integrated into our daily lives the isolation often felt in online learning will be reduced. Video and voice will allow students and instructors to connect on a human level in ways they have not been able to in past online courses. These connections will create new types of relationships and interactions around learning that allow for a deep level of engagement. - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 20, 2014

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
- ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014I think policies are needed to address potential privacy issues.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
An increase in video and voice communication will dramatically improve learning in the online environment. Students that have struggled to communicate in text based online courses will have the ability to join in the conversations. - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 20, 2014. - ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014I concur with this statement. Related to my leadership comment above, making media "meaningful" with relevant and coherent content will be a challenge.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
Tools are popping up all over to increase the use of video and voice in instruction. - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 20, 2014
- ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- ole ole Feb 21, 2014 This trend should be followed carefully. Has an impact on blended learning, flipped classroom, collaborative projects etc. etc.- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014
- vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014Strong support for this from observations of undergraduate student projects at UPenn. We see rapid increase in assignments that emphasize spoken word, original video and mashup/excerpting, even in disciplines that traditionally favor formal writing.
I completely concur with the notion that increased bandwidth, ubiquitious wireless and enhanced compression algorithms will only further increase the capacity to ever improve the media richness of the learning experience- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014
- ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014Virtually anyone can now record and upload video and other media. I think leadership is needed to make students (and faculty) to be better visual communicators. How can these newer tools be exploited to produce more effective educational messages? This is really no different from the traditional quest to help students to be the best possible writers. In this new trend of multimedia communication as described so in this section, I believe more discussion, guidance and leadership is needed to maximize these media in all levels of education. Two of my general education journalism courses (open to all majors) focus on the uses of video and voice for researching course-related topics and interviewing experts about those topics. My two courses are the "scholarship in practice" Intro to Mass Comm and a new "iSeries Course" on our campus - in which a class of 60 students used multimedia to produce an eBook - called "Information 3.0"




VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - brettbixler brettbixler Mar 3, 2014 - brettbixler brettbixler Mar 3, 2014 - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014- jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Mar 4, 2014 - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014 - Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014 - lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014 - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014
- alex alex Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

11. Growing Emphasis on Accessible Technology - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 21, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).

In this context, accessibility is the degree to which a product, device, service, software program or environment is available to as many people as possible. In the past decade, some institutions are working towards making all learning technologies more accessible.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

Institutions might adopt accessibility policies that affect all aspects of technology adoption/adaptation for both learning and non-learning technologies. These policies will need to be enforced, thus indicating the need for governing bodies within the institution that ensure adherence to policy.
When choosing new centrally-supported tools for learning and other uses, the non-accessibility of a particular tool may be a show stopper.

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

Leadership will have to constantly evaluate new technologies and re-examine existing technologies to make decisions on what to adopt, what to adapt, and what to replace. Many of these decisions will be directly tied to cost and thus budgets. Ideally, leadership will develop a multi-year plan to move towards the ideal state of accessible technology throughout the institution.

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Improving the accessibility of learning materials takes time and expertise. Material developers will need to add time to all development cycles to ensure there is a place in the design process for accessibility implementations. Learning designers responsible for content creation will need to be trained in accessibility issues and ways to "accessify" materials. These methods will vary from software product to product, and will change with a particular product over time, thus indicating a need for ongoing training and development. Faculty need to be aware of accessibility basics and perhaps how to accessify materials with the products they most often use, such as MS-Word.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

Penn State's Accessibility Initiative - http://accessibility.psu.edu
Equal Access to Software and Information - http://easi.cc/

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- sheila.carey sheila.carey Feb 21, 2014 This is really important for museums as well. I've been really happy to see some of the shiny new technologies used to improve accessibility. 3D printing allowing blind people to touch copies of objects, google glass with sign language (Turin museum), an app in a Quebec city museum that gives a guided tour in sign language. Really important, and developments I'm happy to see.
- vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014 importance of universal design in library context is high to ensure that all patrons feel welcome and supported, and that collaboration spaces work without alienating a particular learner, and address needs of heterogeneous group work. Understanding the technical, programmatic and workflow aspects of accessibility is not easy and many library staff have inadequate training to cope with these demands. I agree this is an important topic, we need to move forward in this area. We are currently seeing accessibility narrowly defined in higher ed. We tend address the needs of more visible disabilities, physical, vision etc. We need to get to a point of Universal Design, so that all types of learners benefit from accessibility. - jill.leafstedt jill.leafstedt Feb 23, 2014
In the US, groups representing the deaf are starting to come after schools publishing "public educational content" that is not captioned or offered with a transcript. Will schools have to limit what they can publish in terms of what they can afford to have captioned? Will technology for auto-captioning improve quickly? - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 23, 2014
This is still a very big issue for K-12.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014 And for HE - ole ole Feb 24, 2014
- paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Feb 25, 2014 From a library perspective, this is just the right thing to do, and I welcome improvements in this area. Sadly, I think this an often unconsidered subset of the "digital divide" where the most functional technologies are not necessary accessible. A greater buy-in from the technology and commercial sectors would be a big boost in providing us more turn-key solutions to help bridge the gap.
- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Feb 26, 2014 I agree that this is a big issue for HE. I spent nearly a year on an ADA TEchnology Compliance Working Group looking at this issue in my university. To me the biggest issue here is that so very many people need to be involved in creating accessible works that it's a huge challenge to manage. Our recommendations focused on creating policies, creating a number of positions to support compliance issues and spending a good bit of money to make it happen, but everything really comes back to having buy in from the faculty. Just imagine what it would take for every PDF created by the teaching faculty to be ADA complaint. That's not something that's hard to do when creating such documents, but I don't see how it could ever really happen.



VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014 - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014 - sheila.carey sheila.carey Mar 5, 2014 - lkoster lkoster Mar 5, 2014 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014 - Tim_Logan Tim_Logan Mar 6, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014- alex alex Mar 6, 2014


12. Rise of Personal Digital Curation (john Ittelson)


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).

There's a great deal activity taking place in the area of digital curation, content curation tools are coming out almost daily in the areas of both services for those who are professional authors and curators to personal tools that are falling software trend of the consumerization of what had been traditionally ProTools. Desktop publishing, and computer-based video editing is an example of high level media production tools that have made their way into small apps on tablets digital curation is following that path

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Much of the activities around open educational resources OER's, flipped classrooms and MOOC's could be seen as an outgrowth of larger trends in other fields around Digital curation. these activities Blurr the distinctions between expert and an amateur , author and reader, creator and consumer

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Museums have been slow to react to the emergence of (this type of) curation, leading to amusing moments like the head of Zappos labs asserting that the retail industry "invented" the idea of curation. The type of curation we're talking about here is essentially an interim moment, when there's too much information to sift through with the old tools, but new tools don't yet exist. Once those tools are built, the need for this kind of curation will probably evaporate. However, there is a leadership role for museums here, in that they can help to define a different kind of curation--one that involves more richness, more intuitive leaps, and more understanding. Museums can help to define a type of curation that is more than simple "fancy choosing"--a type that will outlive this particular moment. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
- brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 Personal Curation is part of a continuum of activities that most learners go through. If you look at how individuals interact with media of all types, it follows the same process. Consumption, Curation, Collaboration, Critical Thinking and Creation. It can be related to Bloom's Taxonomy and to the SAMR Model, in the fact that it is hierarchical in nature and that individuals interact with different types of media in different ways.

The sudden "hotness" of curation should be (though it isn't yet) pushing museum curators to think differently about the way they conduct their work. Specifically, they should be thinking about how new tools could enable what Robert Scoble calls "real-time curation." If (museum) curators head further in this direction, a need for the development of new software may arise. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014 We see interest in digital curation projects for undergraduate coursework where students are given a collection of objects, they choose a few of interest and then design a fictitious museum exhibit complete with wall plaques. It gives students personal experience in the process of curation as well as practical skills in web design and meta-data.
- mgriffi mgriffi Feb 24, 2014this is a key skill for students moving forward. They need to comprehend their digital decisions as public acts of curation, both in terms of their representation of self and the digital objects they choose to engage. This will also reflect on the above discussions of 3D printing, in terms of deciding what digital objects are pulled into physical existence.
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 24, 2014 Completely agree that personal digital curation is something well worth tracking in any training-teaching-learning environment. Incorporating social media tools such as Pinterest, Scoop.it!, and Delicious into learning provides magnificent opportunities for learners and learning facilitators to creatively share resources and work to create other learning objects that benefit everyone involved.
- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 24, 2014 These curation tools are leading students to become the curator as well, not just for the teacher. The line between the teacher and the student is blurred.
- sbedard sbedard Feb 25, 2014 this fits within the tenants of a Personal Learning Environment, we are curating the information from there as well. This topic adds value to my personal learning. This could be the next step for individual learning. - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 26, 2014 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014¨Personal curation¨ sounds much better than ¨taking selfies.¨ ;)
- bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014 We're doing something like this at Boston College (http://www.bc.edu/offices/tmkp) as a way to draw learners into the process of curation. It has been working quite well so far.
- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 2, 2014 This is something we're following at CNI and Cliff Lynch has written about it Clifford A. Lynch, “The Future of Personal Digital Archiving: Defining the Research Agendas,” Personal Archiving: Preserving Our Digital Heritage, edited by Donald T. Hawkins. Information Today, 2013. (PDF)
Use of this chapter is for noncommercial purposes only. The volume is available for purchase from http://books.infotoday.com/books/Personal-Archiving.shtml
We are also co-sponsors of the Personal Digital Archives Conference, coming up in April http://visions.indstate.edu/pda2014/





VOTES:
- ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014

13. Convergence of Social and Mobile - ryaros ryaros Feb 24, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Although the list of trends already identified digital delivery (#2), personal technology (#12), hybrid learning (#13) and students as creators (#19), we may have recognized the value and various uses of ubiquitous mobile devices, but some are now pursuing the more meaningful trend of systematic integration of these devices into the curriculum with more valid measure of formative and summative assessments. Such trends are required if we are to reduce the negative effects of mobile devices in classrooms and maximize their usefulness to inform our learning.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Nearly 25% of Americans now use only their mobile device to access the web. This trend will only continue as the population ages and mobile technology improves. I think there exists a lot of individual experimentation and educational activities (based on specific apps) to use mobile devices for "show and tell" of student-produced content or - in some cases - for instructors and content management systems to merely transfer content for viewing on a mobile device. The younger learning sector is already prepared- and most are already equipped - with mobile technology that can be tapped for more structured activities beyond just texting, taking photos and checking social media. Institutional policies that focus on broader educational benefits of mobile devices plus related privacy concerns are needed.

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
There is a small but growing population of expert mobile instructors and facilitators. These people can and should provide the leadership to assist other educators with the insights into how the content engagement behaviors of mobile learns differ radically from traditional learners. For example, we know that 90% of text messages are now read within 3 minutes of being delivered. How could education tap this attention to - and comprehension of - information?

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
I think it's obvious that mobile opens up a whole new approach and set of opportunities to revolutionize how students produce and engage with course-related content between face-to-face meetings.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
Yes, this is a passion of mine but the trend to recognize the deeper value of mobile devices is just beginning. I have leaned much from a set of leaders to contribute to a 2012 published by Lexington Books titled, Social Media: Usage and Impact, edited by H.S. Noor Al-Deen and J.A. Hendricks.

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 24, 2014 ryaros, this is a good insight. How do we as teachers shift our model of instruction from a '4-walled' classroom style to a mobile/social approach. We must rethink out delivery.
- sbedard sbedard Feb 25, 2014 instruction needs to be based on problem solving, reaching out to the experts, maybe asking the right questions...questions lead to more questions. This process will naturally lead to a rethinking of delivering content. - ole ole Feb 26, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 28, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 1, 2014 Forcing Mobile learning on the World


VOTES: - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Mar 3, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014 1 Vote - ole ole Mar 4, 2014 - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014

- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014 - Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014

14. Componentization of Education - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 24, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).

Much like the course packs of yore, teachers and learners are now attempting to assemble a wide variety of learning objects into a coherent whole. These may be texts, videos, images, maps, apps, VR segments, and more. Currently this is very difficult to accomplish, though some initiatives in this area are being attempted (e.g. IMS' LTI standard). On a wider scale, students are increasingly componentizing their educations by starting at a community college or online program, transferring credits to another school, filling in requirements or knowledge gaps through online modules, courses, or badging/credentialing opportunities. It is much rarer now for a university or college to be the "complete package" for a student, and schools will need to adapt to that reality.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

Faculty and curriculum designers will learn to be more flexible and may need to adjust from being the person with all the answers or the master plan of study. Registrars will need to vet an increasingly wider array of transfer credits. Students will need to become savvy consumers of learning objects.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

Schools will be looking to partner with others to fill in gaps in curriculum. Faculty and campus-based creators of learning materials will increasingly find themselves competing with for-profit education publishing units. Registrars will need to determine how to vet transfer credits and other types of credentials such as badges and MOOCs.

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 24, 2014 Great observation, and one that works in tandem with the lifelong learning database I've suggested tracking in the new technology area of our Wiki-Thon. - ole ole Feb 26, 2014 Agree. Would also have an impact on the LMS of the 21st Century I keep talking about
- bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014 I completely agree with this contribution. I believe the word I keep hearing for this phenomenon is "disaggregation." I think Katie hit the nail on the head when she mentioned badges and other alternative credentialing tools, as it seems that tracking specific skills acquired throughout the course of one's education (no matter how geographically or temporally dispersed) is the coming trend.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 28, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014



VOTES: - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 3, 2014 - michael.lambert michael.lambert Mar 4, 2014 - Sam Sam Mar 4, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014 - JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 4, 2014 - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Mar 4, 2014- tom.haymes tom.haymes Mar 5, 2014- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014- Katie_vale Katie_vale Mar 5, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Mar 6, 2014 - paul.gallagher paul.gallagher Mar 6, 2014

15. Integration of Idea Spaces - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 24, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).

We are seeing a convergence of technology, science on learning and cognition, and business practices, particularly in Silicon Valley to create what are called "Lean Startups." Companies like Google are seizing opportunities in this area to foster innovation in their businesses. This presents opportunities as we seek to create innovation both inside and outside the classroom. I break this trend down into three components: Space, Time, and Structure. Space is physical space, time is temporal space, and structure discusses how cultural and mental constructs can either foster or stifle creative, critical thinking.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

As we build classrooms, meeting spaces, organizations, etc. we need to be aware of the constraints and opportunities presented by these innovations and customize our efforts as a mechanism for reinventing education going forward.

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

We are consciously building classrooms and even whole buildings with openness and synergies in mind. I am starting up a teaching lab to give faculty the opportunity to learn their way into new possibilities for their teaching.

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

We have long argued that the Sage on the Stage is a bad teaching model in many instances and persists mainly out of industrialized convenience and cultural habits. However, we have struggled to move our faculty or our institutions as a whole into new modes of activity both inside and outside the classroom. The notion of Idea Spaces is designed to integrate a wide range of activities and spaces into a mechanism for positive change.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

At HCC we are building a new, integrated STEM campus that incorporates many of the concepts found under Idea Spaces. The campus will create many opportunities for experiential learning, including a Maker Space, synergies, including a Collaboratorium, and the Teaching Innovation Lab, an environment containing a number of Learning Space designs and a Media Commons designed to support rotating cohorts of faculty seeking to redesign their courses.
http://nwc.hccs.edu/stemcampus/

- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 24, 2014 http://www.classroom.umn.edu/projects/alc.html


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.

I believe it was MIT that had some spaces set up as described, it was in part through the efforts of Peter Senge of SOL.
I remember they were used by visitors/staff for collaborative work. Also, this ties into the informal and non formal learning concepts.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 24, 2014 Like Tom, I've been fascinated by flexible spaces that have been referred to in a variety of ways ("idea spaces" is a nice one, "makerspaces/hackerspaces" is another, and one that colleagues and I have been exploring is "social learning spaces" that facilitate social learning onsite, online, or in blended versions. A recent visit to the Weigle Information Commons at the University of Pennsylvania provided an inspiring glimpse into a library version of this concept. - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 24, 2014

Paul, first of all, thank you for the observations. I do want to emphasize that the physical space is only part of this concept. Learning Spaces have been discussed for the better part of a decade but I have been surprised at how little scholarship has been done on their efficacy. They feel right and anecdotally seem to make a difference. However, the novelty of the experience for the students and faculty might account for some of the differences in achievement that have been measured. I think this is in part because space is only one part of the equation. Until you can figure out how to address the temporal and structural issues I am not sure whether we can accurately figure out how much of a difference the physical environment truly makes. It's a little like having a bright, shiny new Ferrari but only a dirt road to drive it on. You'll never know what it's capable of unless you deal with the road.

Michael, yes, I am aware of the ALC and am very intrigued by its possibilities. We are actually building 2-4 of those spaces on our new campuses. As a plus, it seems like a very effective, innovative concept. My only concerns with it is it's lack of flexibility. It's going to hard to redo that room if we decide it doesn't work or if we think another model is more effective. It's a strong enough concept, however, that we're willing to take a flyer on a couple of them. - tom.haymes tom.haymes Feb 25, 2014

- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott U. Virginia Digital Scholars Lab has a wonderful "Think Tank" idea space. Georgia Tech library has an Student Entrepreneur room which is a space for students to generate ideas for start-ups. I think we will see more of these spaces.


VOTES:
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014 1 Vote

16. Convergence of Trends - sheila.carey sheila.carey Feb 24, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
We will increasingly see several trends overlapping. It has happened in the past when we discussed (in the museums report) mobile, AR, and other technologies such as location based service. Mobile is the technology making those other technologies popular. This will only increase when more people start using wearable technology. Ingress is a great example of this, when it involves gaming, AR, and wearable technology. I think this convergence will happen more and more. It will be increasingly difficult to consider a technology trend in isolation as we enter a period of potentially ubiquitous computing.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Museums will need to consider the implications of the trending technologies in combination with other technologies, rather than on their own, both in creating new content, but also in terms of policies regarding new technologies entering the museum with visitors. If they want to encourage visitors to use their mobiles in the museums (by providing apps and tours), they have to be prepared for visitors taking photographs and using other technologies as well.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
If they want to encourage visitors to use their mobiles in the museums (by providing apps and tours), they have to be prepared for visitors taking photographs and using other technologies as well.




(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 24, 2014 Ditto. I keep seeing ways in which trends, challenges, and technologies overlap, which makes it difficult to effectively respond without being aware of the interwoven nature of all that we're exploring. - ole ole Feb 26, 2014



VOTES:

17. Western Boarding Schools Moving Eastward - michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 24, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
In China, Hong Kong, and other Asian countries, there is a trend of taking the 'western-style' of education to Asia. These countries want to duplicate/scale the 'western' model. Yet, the western models want to change their approach and instructional style. In addition, there is a small trend that American/European families want to send their child to place like China to gain a global view.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Asian education is making shift. The education systems in Asian countries want to reduce their class size, change their delivery methods and provide a stronger 'thinking' curriculum. There is little policy impact here, but it is interesting to note that neither system is satisfied.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Would like to see Asian/Western styles find the middle of the Venn diagram. Both systems have something to offer. There is strength in each. How can these education systems communicate to one another, like that of the UN/governments.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
The western system should open itself to understand and learn more about the 'eastern' approach to learning. I'm not trying to promote the 'eastern' style but there are elements/programs that are clearly more effective. Example: students respect to learning, number of school days, learning a second language, etc.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.





VOTES: - brettbixler brettbixler Mar 3, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Mar 3, 2014 1 Vote
- ryaros ryaros Mar 4, 2014
- deborah.cooke deborah.cooke Mar 4, 2014
- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014 - lkoster lkoster Mar 5, 2014
- lindleyshedd lindleyshedd Mar 6, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 6, 2014
- kathy.smart kathy.smart Mar 6, 2014

18. Mastery-Based Learning and Competency-Based Education - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014

- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014
- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Mar 3, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Mar 3, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Mastery-based learning has been around for a long time. In a sense it is actually very, very old, as it is the quintessential work of a tutor. When instructing only one student, a tutor can ensure that a student has mastered one concept before moving onto the next concept that builds on the first. With the rise of mass schooling and the logistical challenges it created, mastery learning was no longer an option, as teachers were forced to work through content at a set pace. Students were regularly assessed, but these assessments were rarely used to shore up weak spots in their learning - more often the assessments are used to rank students relative to each other. It is a truism, but a student who gets an 80% on a test probably does not understand 20% of the concepts and information assessed. But what if a skill or concept on which the next concept is built is only shakily understood, or is part of the 20% that the student does not understand? I believe it was Sal Khan in the One World Schoolhouse who compared this process to building a house. If the foundation of a house is 80% solid, no building inspector in his or her right mind would approve further construction until the issues with that foundation were shored up. If a 75% wall were then erected on top of an 80% foundation and then one added a 70% roof, is it any wonder that the house is liable to collapse?

At any rate, the idea here is quite simple: students demonstrate that they have mastered a concept and then they move on. Through interactive computing technology we are now able to offer this at a cost low enough for all students to use it. Think of it kind of like a virtual tutor.

Mastery-based learning is closely aligned in my mind to competency-based education (CBE) as well. CBE asks at a somewhat larger scale what a student can do rather than how long they have been in a classroom. A set of competencies, rather than a certain number of credit hours, makes up a degree within this system, and are directly assessed.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
This year we saw a great example of how the Department of Education changed their views of CBE by allowing federal aid to such programs. This is a huge shift from the credit-hour model and I think will be looked back upon as a turning point in higher education.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Leadership would have to be willing to fundamentally re-evaluate the boundaries of the 16-week semester and move beyond the credit hour. Measuring seat time exists as a proxy for measuring learning, but we've come to see that it is not the best or perhaps even a good proxy. With well-designed assessments it seems to this


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Taken to a large scale, this would overturn a lot of the things we think about teaching in higher ed. We know that students learn at different rates and have different levels of comprehension, and we know that they need different amounts of practice to master skills. Teachers will become less lecturers as facilitators, helping students find content relevant to the course and working with them in difficult spots. Students will not be afraid to fail because they will be able to try assessments multiple times without penalty.

I think it will also tie into the microcredentialing/badging areas that we've discussed so much. Individualization, learning analytics, and structured skill and content pathways also tie in here.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
Southern New Hampshire University's College for America program is a good example, as is Western Governor's University.


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.

This will be very important for K-12 also. It ties into life long learning, challenge based learning, student self assessment.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 28, 2014- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014
Important but again, who makes the decision as to what is covered, how it is accessed, how much time 'it' should be given, etc. How do we keep the curriculum 'open' that allows for students to develop their passion…experiment…embrace 'safe' failure…? - michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 28, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 1, 2014 the scope here is very wide. But when you think about life long learning, what skills a young person needs to develop in order to curate, manage, produce, and just be a positive digital citizen, somewhere between mastery of content and competency based education needs to emerge. Learning takes place in so many areas and for an individual it takes place at many different levels based on experiences. the physical school no longer provides the only learning space. There are many ways to prove competency but you need to demonstrate mastery. For k12 education the shift here is huge, but the times are changing. Some extra thoughts... A framework for innovation in the classroom



VOTES:

19. Use of Tools to Promote Creative Thinking (Lisa Stephens)


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Employers are trending toward hiring those with "soft skills" and ability to demonstrate creative thinking.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/23/opinion/sunday/friedman-how-to-get-a-job-at-google.html?_r=0
Profiling tools such as Myers-Briggs, DiSC or Strengthfinder provide useful insight into emotional intelligence, or refined skill sets on how people relate/work within teams, but those tools do not indicate creative styles preferences or how people innovate in teams (e.g. Foursight)
Increasingly constrained resources lead to creative problem solving in new ways, and work cultures will see increased competitive advantage where creativity is fostered at multiple levels.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
Higher education is in the business of fostering and incubating new ideas, but are often culturally very conservative work environments. This makes it challenging to foster creative work in an era of constrained resources, where an administrative premium is placed on predictable projects within known resources. It takes forward thinking and brave leaders to create environments where employees can incubate and communicate new ideas in service of higher education.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
It will require leadership to demonstrate commitment to creative processes by rewarding people with novel and innovative approaches to problem solving.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Opportunity cost is a real issue. If time and resources are carved out for practices that are not valued by leadership (creative problem solving, innovation planning, scaling solutions) then innovators will not be supported, or worse, marginalized for "thinking outside the box."


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
Any large scale or collaborative project can be an example of creative problem solving. The flexspace project is a good example that I'm familiar with, but there are many others.


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.



VOTES: - jnxyz jnxyz Mar 3, 2014 - Sam Sam Mar 4, 2014- holly holly Mar 4, 2014- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2014
- mgriffi mgriffi Mar 5, 2014 - lkoster lkoster Mar 5, 2014- nwitt nwitt Mar 6, 2014- Lisa.Stephens Lisa.Stephens Mar 6, 2014 - mrskeeler mrskeeler Mar 6, 2014

20. The Rise of Low-Cost Technology - nwitt nwitt


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
The Edtech world is quick to investigate the latest technology and tech companies are promoting devices such as the iPad, Surface etc in a teaching and learning context. Is there an assumption that our students are getting the latest 'must have' devices and are we designing content based on these assumption e..g iBooks. We have seen a rise in low cost technology in recent months e.g. Ubislate at $50 (http://www.ubislate.com/) and Nokia 220 for $40 (http://news.sky.com/story/1216471/prices-slashed-as-latest-smartphones-unveiled). Will the availability of low-cost devices lead the way to the democratisation of technology? - nwitt nwitt Feb 25, 2014


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
One way costs are kept down is the reduction in processor/memory/operating system when compared to a high end device. If we see more low cost devices being used on campus we may need to change our design principles to ensure all users can access content and systems. With device being at near give away prices we may see entire faculties or even the institutions bulk buying to issue them for free. This is currently unsustainable for most institutions if looking at a $500 iPad, but a $50 tablet may be a more sustainable solution. - nwitt nwitt Feb 25, 2014

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
If low cost tech proves effective and feasible this development will impact investment strategies as well as IT support. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Mar 2, 2014


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area that involve potential solutions to these challenges?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.


*END OF TRENDS VOTING.*



New Trends Proposed by Panel that are already on our Technology Master List (not eligible for voting)


The Internet of Things - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
I know we have Internet of Things listed as technology but here it is in the larger context as a trend.
Disruption 4: Internet of Things
The final disruption that will upend IT in coming months and years is the "Internet of Things," where sensors are placed inside every physical object and connect wirelessly to the Internet or other entities in order to collect and share data about the object and about our use of the object. These sensors will not necessarily be controlled by humans, said Plummer.
"Wearables" — Google Glass, the Samsung Galaxy Gear watch and Nike+ Fuelband SE — fall into this category. On the commercial side, Gartner predicts that by 2020 consumer data collected from wearable devices will drive 5 percent of sales among the top global companies.
What IT needs to ask itself is how wearables will affect planning for future applications, just as smartphones and tablets have done. Plummer warned not to view wearables and sensor usage as replacements for existing technology, but as drivers for new use cases.
In fact, every form of disruption should spur IT leaders to take more risks and look for ways to transform the organization, not just enhance or extend what's already in place, he emphasized. "Enterprises have a tendency to figure out first why something won't work then back their way into what will work. You have to turn that around," Plummer said. "You have to shoot for the stars to reach the moon and [figure out] why something will work first."
As an example he pointed to cloud computing. IT organizations moved infrastructure to the cloud as a means of running workloads. "That is nice, but it's only enhancement. It's just moving the workload." Better to figure out how to get rid of the workload altogether by using somebody else's capabilities.
IT must take on the role of broker, acting as an intermediary between technology and the business functions of the organization, helping to "integrate, aggregate or customize it, instead of trying to control it." Do that with your technology choices," he said, "and you will have a better chance of getting a first mover advantage."

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?



(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

Hard to be precise about predictions re internet of things and learning, but a couple of points may be of relevance. Firstly, education at large should know about the technological development, and for some subjects (higher ed - high tech) internet of things may have direct and curricular relevance. Secondly, this nr 1 kicks in, this will impact how we envisage the modern learning arena and how we invest in tech in schools and HEIs in the years to come. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
http://www.kortuem.com/internet-of-things-education/- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014

http://blogs.princeton.edu/etc/2012/02/24/the-internet-of-things/comment-page-1/- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014

http://www.connectedworldmag.com/latestNews.aspx?id=NEWS131216132942207- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
- jnxyz jnxyz Feb 20, 2014 One important distinction here IMHO is that while there are some consumer internet of things devices that directly and independently communicate across the internet, most current devices are more in the 'network of things' category who need another smart device to communicate with across a localised network.
- mgriffi mgriffi Feb 24, 2014There is also the matter of the security/stability concerns inherent here. As these devices proliferate, how to we police the on campus narratives that they create. Certainly these invisible narratives can be seen at threatening from an administrative position as they are very difficult to control and easy to proliferate. Our institutions must participate in these narratives to be effective.- brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 This is more than just wearables, it extends into the home at at very rapid rate with Belkin's WeMo line of devices and Google's recent acquisition of Nest.

I wonder if we're nearing a point where a broad discussion of "the internet of things" is no longer helpful. It is a term that was used by pundits for a while, but I almost never hear it in practice anymore, partially (I believe) because this idea is now so pervasive that identifying it as a broad category is no longer helpful. If feels to me like we're saying "computers remain important." I think it might be more effective, in the Horizon Reports, if distinct sub-categories were identified (as in, the privacy concerns related to Google's acquisition of Nest mentioned above, and how this acquisition is different due to the personal data involved) instead. - kovensmith kovensmith Mar 2, 2014


- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 20, 2014 I've gone over the Wiki-Thon Master List of Existing Key Trends several times, comparing it with the Horizon Report list. Everything seems to be there. Almost. Someone on the HR Board had suggested that Teaching Kids to Code, which I consider part of the Makerspaces/Do-It-Yourself trend, should be added, but I believe this can be considered covered by the Shift from Students as Consumers to Students as Creators trend. The list of suggestions above is certainly interesting...the Mind, Brain and Education one in particular. BUT...you knew a BUT was coming...I am convinced that Games and Gamification is a substantial/important enough phenomenon to belong not just on the Technologies list, but to be a trend in and of itself. As soon as I finish typing this up here, I'm going to add it to the HR trend list too!- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014

Games and Gamification


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).

Please forgive the length...this is lifted directly from the HR description. Read this and then try to tell me this isn't a trend!

The games culture has grown to include a substantial proportion of the world’s population, with the age of the average gamer increasing with each passing year. As tablets and smartphones have proliferated, desktop and laptop computers, television sets, and gaming consoles are no longer the only way to connect with other players online, making game-play a portable activity that can happen in a diverse array of settings. Gameplay has long since moved on from solely being recreational and has found considerable traction in the worlds of commerce, productivity, and education as a useful training and motivation tool. While a growing number of educational institutions and programs are experimenting with game-play, there has also been increased attention surrounding gamification -- the integration of gaming elements, mechanics, and frameworks into non-game situations and scenarios. Businesses have embraced gamification as a way to design incentive programs that engage employees through rewards, leader boards, and badges, often with a mobile component. Although more nascent than in military or industry settings, the gamification of education is gaining support among educators who recognize that effectively designed games can stimulate large gains in productivity and creativity among learners.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

Impact policy? We're talking about nothing less than a complete revolution in teaching/learning. The "lecture model" was developed during the Middle Ages; the 21st century will be when the "games model" takes its place. No more, e.g., multiple-choice Biology exams...students will take a Fantastic-Voyage-like trip through a body to cure cancer...if the patient lives, A+! ;)
The most important impact on policy may be the simple "fact" that games are included in the mindsets of policy and policymakers with regard to what kind of artifacts can be used in the teaching and learning process. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

The very definition of teaching/learning will change. Who qualifies as a teacher will change.
Several impacts may occurs. Assessment mindsets will be challenged, of course. Secondly, the use of games may require adjustments in how we think about lesson planning and the structure of the school day. A third issue is how games may be used across subjects. A fourth challenge or issue is how we empower teachers to start using games in the classroom. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

Along with the evolving expectations of teachers, the criteria for effective administrators will also change.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

I've maintained Second Life cybercampuses for higher ed and K-12 since 2006, added OpenSimulator grids to the mix for K-12 since 2009. Have used wide variety of "educational games" for elementary, middle and high school IT/Tech classes...and other subjects for cross-curricular/interdisciplinary instruction. Future plans: "gamify" several subjects using 3DGamesLab approach...continue using MinecraftEdu and explore usage of other "game games"...etc.

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.

Games and gamification do not have to be technologically based. Technology is only one method of delivery. You can have analog card games and gold stars on the wall. So I'd like to see a clear distinction of this on the technologies list - but in doing so we'd deny the bigger picture/potential of games and gamification. Including these here as a trend is a great way to make this happen; I agree with David. We do need to discuss lumping games and gamification together as a trend, however. Games <> gamification. By keeping these together, we risk confusion. - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 21, 2014 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014
- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 22, 2014 Great minds think alike. ;) I just scooped an article along these lines today:
http://ashleytan.wordpress.com/2014/02/21/gamification-is-not-game-based-learning/ BTW, shameless plug time...please follow my Scoop.it page if you're so inclined:
http://www.scoop.it/t/3d-virtual-worlds-educational-technology
Love the "bigger picture thinking" that relates to games! Thank you for noting it. I'd also like us to start separating games from gamification! - kstubbs kstubbs Feb 22, 2014- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014 I would like the the difference between gamification and game-based-learning to be better defined and game-based learning as a trend, more than gamification - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014
- sheila.carey sheila.carey Feb 25, 2014 There are a lot of interesting games in museums; the Smithsonian Museum if American Art has been exploring this in interesting ways. This article is a few years old, but is about the Smithsonian games
http://www.argn.com/tag/smithsonian/

- davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 22, 2014 Every time I visit this wiki, I see more great ideas. I still think that maybe we're missing two more:
- sbedard sbedard Mar 1, 2014 ideas to implement Make Progress Obvious in Gamification for Learning


Big Data and Predictive Planning - jnxyz jnxyz Feb 20, 2014 [Editor's Note: These are good dimensions to add to existing technology topic Learning Analytics]

http://www.theverge.com/2014/2/19/5419854/the-minority-report-this-computer-predicts-crime-but-is-it-racist
(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Basically, powerful enough computing processing an ever larger amount of data lets planners (be they police or educators etc) to predict problems before they occur.
A brief video sample of big data visualizations - ryaros ryaros Feb 21, 2014


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
There are many many ethical issues to be addressed - as well as the notion that a prediction that someone will need help in some learning area is not the same as that actually necessary being the case.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Humans with new technology tend to use it first and then ask questions later - I'd hope that leaders would assess the capabilities that big data is making available to educators carefully and use it as an additional guide not a final determiner of policy and programs.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
- ryaros ryaros Feb 21, 2014Perhaps introducing the powerful pros and cautious cons this capability though better "data literacy?"
I think the most relevant area where Big Data and Predictive Planning kicks in is the area of learning analytics. There are many activities within learning analytics, but I think - in a Norwegian setting that is - important to return to the fundamental issues of why it may prove worthwhile to invest in learning analytics and how formative assessment may benefit from it. I think it is important to get the basics right in the first place. Then we may move on the discuss what kind of data sets are available and imaginable, models for learning analytics implementation and privacy and security issues. In the Norwegian context, I have voiced the need of a national alliance between government, research, industry and education. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
- ryaros ryaros Feb 21, 2014 There are so many! Perhaps the best example for a "trends" discussion is this Google trends map!



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
Predict problems before they occur, I like that. So, lets tie in the value of Big Data and Predictive Planning with the higher purpose of solving complex problems. Using systems thinking and prototyping. What might that look like?
http://social-labs.org/ - jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014
Would second the ethical issues notion, e.g. the "Target knows you are pregnant before you have told your parents" type of data mining. Faculty can even get uneasy by the use of CRM tools designed to support them. - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 23, 2014 - ole ole Feb 26, 2014
- sbedard sbedard Mar 1, 2014 Datafication: How the Lens of Data Changes How We See Ourselves




New Trends Proposed by Panel that Overlap with Existing Trends (not eligible for voting)

Social Solitude - vedantha vedantha Feb 22, 2014 [Editor's Note: Will add as new dimensions to existing trend "Growing Ubiquity of Social Media."]


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).

Today’s students live on Twitter, Snapchat, Tumblr, Reddit and other social media and manage their online privacy settings with a vengeance. They are both hyper-social and hyper-solitary. Spending time in in-person casual conversation – “hanging out” – feels very different to them than it did to earlier generations. On many campuses, mental health concerns are high, and it is challenging for campus staff to understand how to intervene when cyber-bullying and similar behaviors surface. Campus newspapers now receive hundreds of comments on each online article and entire online conversations flare up over a weekend, invisible to those who did not know where to tune in.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

In higher education, lack of awareness among faculty and staff of the psychology and complexity of today’s social media affects their effectiveness. The use of arbitrary rules – “don’t touch your cell phone during my three-hour lecture class” – creates resentment and apathy. Student ability to “game the system” is seen as threatening rather than creative. Unnecessary misunderstandings can arise across generational cultures. Traditional expectations of group work may not work well in this new social setting.

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Leadership in K-12 and higher education needs to be well-informed about rapidly changing technologies. Not being aware of new social media channels leaves leaders looking foolish at important times. For example, we have learned quite a bit about student perspectives by paying attention to Twitter references to library buildings and services.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Understanding the complex relationship that young people have to their phones is crucial. One study from Stanford found that students think of their phone as similar to an arm or a leg – a basic part of their person. Knowing how students use, and misuse, phones and laptops can be essential to effective teaching.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
Student perspectives on Facebook, laptops in class, and other hot-button topics have been explored in annual faculty symposia at Penn: http://wic.library.upenn.edu/wicshops/pennedutech.html and three sample videos are highlighted at http://pennwic.wordpress.com/2012/02/05/three-videos-from-students-point-of-view/


(6) Comments from other Panel Members. - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 23, 2014 Is this a trend or a challenge? ;) Years ago I used to call this Anti Social Media Behavior. Get it? Anti-social behavior...anti social media...yes, it is quite witty...thank you. ;) As long as teachers can get fired for Facebook posts, this will never entirely disappear. But let's focus on the senseless Battle of the Cellphones...Students vs. Teachers/Administrators. Every time I think a truce is imminent at my school, we have a kid suspended for using one. For the past year or so, I've been conducting a little experiment I'll be writing about later. I simply don't mention cellphones in my classes. I don't tell my students what they can or can't do with them. I've been very pleased with the results so far. As soon as I stopped making it a problem, it ceased being a problem. Imagine that. ;) I agree. I am not sure where I mentioned it, perhaps Horizon K-12 but, we are going to have to give on this. I am hoping business forces our hand and we come around.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 23, 2014
- ole ole Feb 24, 2014 The last study environment survey of my university (2011) showed that 9 per cent feel lonely in their day-to-day lives and 16 per cent in exam periods. So this is a thing that should be addressed.
http://www.au.dk/om/nyheder/nyhed/artikel/study-environment-survey-satisfaction-but-room-for-improvement/
- JoanLippincott JoanLippincott Mar 2, 2014 I think this is particularly interesting when thinking about mental health issues in our student populations. What is the responsibility of teachers/administrators/mental health staff to monitor social media and identify problems. This is a thorny area but one that could use some focused study.


Use of Social Media for Course-based Simulation (Lisa Stephens) [Editor's Note: Will add as new dimensions to existing trend "Growing Ubiquity of Social Media."]


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Faculty are showing increased willingness to use social media in service to simulate events as part of course work.


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
It will present a (further) security challenge where faculty and students make use of "non campus approved" tools in service of instruction.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
Constant IT Communications challenge to inform the student population about how their information is "phished"


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
Will help instruction


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?
Yes, one of our social work classes is investigating use of twitter and facebook to simulate disaster planning and emergency response.


(6) Comments from other Panel Members.

- ole ole Feb 26, 2014


Blended Synchronous Learning [Editor's Note: Great dimensions to add to existing trend "Increasing Use of Hybrid Learning Designs."]


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
Increasingly teachers are attempting to use real-time collaborative technologies such as desktop video-conferencing, web-conferencing and virtual worlds to enable remote students to seamlessly participate in live classes. More than just broadcasting a lecture, blended synchronous learning often attempts to have remote and face-to-face students interact with the teacher and each other as though they were in the same room. In response to a survey on rich-media synchronous technology usage over 39% of tertiary educators from Australia and New Zealand (n=750) indicated that they had attempted to unite remote and face-to-face students in the same live classes (
http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/wellington12/2012/images/custom/bower%2c_matt_-_use_of_media.pdf
). Thus this trend is far less recognised than it is pervasive.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

In order to provide a higher quality learning experience for remote students, and potentially face-to-face students, institutions may choose to offer their degrees in blended synchronous learning mode. It enables remote students access to the real-time interactions that are so often required for efficient learning, face-to-face students to have access to a broader range of perspectives, and institutions to in many cases offer more financially viable courses. That means that institutions needs to reconfigure learning and teaching spaces to apply blended synchronous learning approaches, and provide appropriate support for staff in order for them to do it well.

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

Leaders will need to account for blended synchronous learning in their strategic and operational planning. There will also be a new bread of leading blended synchronous learning teachers.

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

A range of new technologies is poised to radically transform blended synchronous learning. In the future we will access rich-media digital information through the technology we wear (for example, Google Glasses, http://www.google.com/glass/start). Through technology such as the X-Box Kinect (http://www.xbox.com/en-US/Kinect) it is already possible to create digital models of the world around us (including ourselves!) in real-time. Augmented reality systems such as String (http://www.poweredbystring.com) allow information to be overlayed onto the world around us. Initiatives such as Photosynth (http://photosynth.net) and similar initiatives are working to create models of the world based on social data that can be viewed from any point and any angle. The convergence of all of these technologies is a world where:
  • We can see and hear rich-media information naturally through the technology we wear
  • A three dimensional model of the world is being created in real-time
  • Models can be superimposed, interleaved, and manipulated as required
  • People can digitally navigate through any environment and be represented in that environment.

It may only a matter of time until students will be able to access a three-dimensional model of their face-to-face classrooms from home, and face-to-face students will be able to see, hear, and interact with models of remote students as though they are in the room. Integrated Virtual Networks (http://www.ivn.net) has already taken steps in this direction.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

The Blended Synchronous Learning Project has conducted a collective case study of several blended synchronous learning instances, with video case studies available at http://blendsync.org .- matt.bower matt.bower Mar 2, 2014

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.



Other Notes and Perspectives from Panel Members (not eligible for voting)


Evidence from the Field of Mind, Brain, and Education - ole ole Feb 20, 2014

(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
This is not a new trend per se but rather food for thought.
Increasingly, I get asked 'Is there evidence for the didactic or learning potential' in this when I take part in discussions on using and how to use new technology in HE education. Of course there is evidence in many cases, and this has definitely been reflected in the Horizon Reports over the years. But I believe that the recommendations would gain trenchancy if there was more direct focus on a relatively new type of evidence: The research field of Mind, Brain and Education is really gaining ground these years, and I think many of the insights from this field can be of value for the discussions and the recommendations.
This as a supplement to the fantastic amount of fantastic best practice cases that are what really makes this IT / HE pedagogy world go round. And of course as a supplement to qualitative and quantitative research.

(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?
I believe that we can inform the recommendations very much by using input from Mind, Brain and Education research.
Firstly, there is a general need to raise awareness among policymakers about the importance about research on brain and the learning. This awareness is lacking today. Secondly, this awareness is closely related to the need to maintain a evidence-based approach about how teaching and learning and be personalized. A third perspective is the need to inform the debate on the effects on brain and learning by increased and early exposure to technology among children. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Feb 25, 2014

(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?
N/A

(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?
See 2 - many technology sceptics (and unfortunately there are still many of them at least in my world) can be moved.

(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?

(6) Comments from other Panel Members.
Does this include physiological research on the brain from the past 10 years or so? If so, I definitely agree this is a viable trend. Much of what we can/should do is increasingly informed by hard data on how the brain works. - brettbixler brettbixler Feb 20, 2014 - davidwdeeds davidwdeeds Feb 20, 2014 This is interesting stuff. I've read about it before, but it's been a while. When I Googled it, I discovered that Harvard has a master's program in Mind, Brain and Education!
http://www.gse.harvard.edu/academics/masters/mbe/ - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 20, 2014 This is an incredibly intriguing area of study for anyone involved in training-teaching-learning, and I felt incredibly behind the times a few years ago when I first began reading about it and incorporating lessons learned into all I do with learners. Didn't find many colleagues exploring the topic at that point, but am seeing increasing attention given to it among ASTD (American Society for Training & Development) colleagues more recently. I've been adding to a personal reading list on the topic that I curate on Goodreads at http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/5302351-paul-signorelli?shelf=brain. - ole ole Feb 21, 2014 I took up this field after a summer course at Harvard, so you're right, David. A good way into the field is the OECD Report Understanding the Brain: The Birth of a Learning Science - a bit old 2007, but still ok as a point of departure, and it can be downloaded for free:
http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic850552.files/Understanding%20the%20brain%20OECD.pdf
I think that this is a very important and highly pertinent comment,but my fear, at least in pedagogical terms, is that this type of advanced brain mapping science doesn't take us back down the behavioural path, given that I believe that we have come so far and so fruitfully down that of a constructivist approach to learning- kevin.ashford-rowe kevin.ashford-rowe Feb 22, 2014- lori.swinney lori.swinney Feb 25, 2014 In addition to the work at Harvard GSE (Graduate School of Education), other Harvard colleagues in Brain and Cognitive Sciences have been working in this area, most notably Dan Schacter and Karl Szpunar:
http://www.pnas.org/content/110/16/6313.full.pdf We have sponsorship for this via the Harvard Initiative on Learning and Teaching (hilt.harvard.edu) - Katie_vale Katie_vale Feb 23, 2014
- ole ole Feb 24, 2014 The advantage of the field of Mind, Brain and Education is that it is not exclusively based on fMRI scannings but on the intersection og pedagogy, psychology and neuro science - and that theory and practice are equally important.- holly holly Feb 24, 2014so this is different from the Cognitive Sciences yes? It does seem like a rather cumbersome title for trend. - paul.signorelli paul.signorelli Feb 24, 2014 Holly, would "the physiology of learning" be a more concise way to tag the trend? "Brain-based Teaching," used elsewhere on this page, might also work. I would like to recommend John Medina's "Brain Rules" as a possible resource on this topic. - brumbaugh brumbaugh Feb 25, 2014 - ole ole Feb 26, 2014 Yes, Paul, Medinas label is good as is his book!
The trends in learning space design incorporate concepts of brain-based learning. Furniture, lighting, open-concept and activity are based on how the brain engages in the learning process. Creating learning spaces that can stimulate creativity, problem solving and activity are key components of deep learning. - lori.swinney lori.swinney Feb 26, 2014
I agree that this is a fascinating trend and should be added to the list. - bryan.blakeley bryan.blakeley Feb 27, 2014 There is a strong need for evidence-based approach on how different technologies/digital strategies are stimulating the brain to better explain how this effects student's learning - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Mar 2, 2014

Trends to watch.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 21, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).
I beleive we have touched on these "Trends to Watch in 2014", link to article below. However, some examples and verbage might be extracted to compliment.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 20, 2014
http://www.baselinemag.com/innovation/six-top-tech-trends-to-watch-in-2014.html/


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?



(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?



(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?



(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.



Fingerprinting replaces cookies? See link below.- jmorrison jmorrison Feb 20, 2014


(1) Please define this trend below (4-5 sentences).

http://www.forbes.com/sites/adamtanner/2013/06/17/the-web-cookie-is-dying-heres-the-creepier-technology-that-comes-next/


(2) How might this trend impact policy for the learning sector you know best?

Again, privacy is an issue for student data.Although it is said to be used or marketing purposes, it would be an issue in K12. No one wants to feel like they are being watched.


(3) How might this trend impact leadership for the learning sector you know best?

This is an example of an area where leadership should be paying atention to it and they are not. Most district leaders have probably never heard of this yet pondered successful supports for sudent learning impacted by it.


(4) How might this trend impact practice for the learning sector you know best?

The article does mention if we do not want to be tracked stay off the internet. Although that seems likely, I wish there was a more positive answer.


(5) Do you know of any projects/examples underway in this area?



(6) Comments from other Panel Members.